Medical marijuana backers to lobby California lawmakers rather than push for ballot initiative By Peter Hecht, McClatchy Newspapers

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Medical marijuana backers to lobby California lawmakers rather than push for ballot initiative

By Peter Hecht, McClatchy Newspapers

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Medical marijuana advocates are dropping efforts to qualify a November ballot initiative to regulate California’s dispensary industry and instead plan a media campaign to lobby the Legislature to tackle the issue.

Cannabis industry groups including dispensaries, medical marijuana growers and a powerful union drafted the proposed measure in the face of an ongoing federal crackdown on California’s $1.5 billion medicinal pot trade.

But a top campaign director said initiative planners instead have decided to run television and radio ads to urge lawmakers and Gov. Jerry Brown to enact rules governing how medical marijuana outlets operate in the state.

"We’re not doing the initiative. We’re pulling the plug on it," said Dan Rush, director of the Medical Cannabis and Hemp Division for the United Food and Commercial Workers, which has been organizing California pot workers for the past two years.

Rush said Thursday that he had secured $1.2 million in pledges, mostly from the dispensary industry, toward $2 million to gather signatures for a November initiative.

But with time running out and other major funders undecided over whether to pursue a ballot or legislative strategy, Rush said initiative backers decided to take their case to the Capitol instead. He said the money pledged to date will be used for "a full-on media campaign," including lobbying and likely television and radio spots this summer.

Democratic Assemblyman Tom Ammiano has introduced legislation seeking to accomplish many aims of the ballot initiative, the proposed Medical Marijuana Regulation, Control and Taxation Act.

Ammiano’s Assembly Bill 2312 would create a Board of Medical Marijuana Enforcement under the state Department of Consumer Affairs to approve or deny permits for dispensaries and oversee medical marijuana cultivation, transportation, distribution and sales.

The Ammiano bill also includes a provision in the proposed initiative to mandate that cities and counties permit one dispensary for every 50,000 residents unless local voters approve local ordinances to ban them.

But the Ammiano bill scraps plans for a 2.5 percent statewide tax on medical marijuana businesses in favor of provisions allowing local governments to impose a one-quarter percent to 2 percent tax on medicinal pot transactions.

"They were not going to get a tax passed in Sacramento," said Dale Gieringer, California director of the National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws.

Even a regulatory measure for marijuana could prove a tough sell to lawmakers, many of whom are skittish about being portrayed as pro-dispensary.

The proposed ballot initiative came together after California’s four U.S. attorneys announced charges Oct. 7 against targeted dispensaries, growers and financial speculators in the medical marijuana market and threatened pot business landlords with seizures of properties.

Backers of the initiative were up against a June deadline to gather a half-million valid voter signatures to qualify the measure.

"I always felt it was an uphill battle because we started so late," Gieringer said.

CONTINUE READING…


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‘Kentucky Cares’ campaign surpasses $400,000

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‘Kentucky Cares’ campaign surpasses $400,000

Today’s Kentucky Cares Telethon in partnership with the American Red Cross, WKYT, Clear Channel Radio, the Lexington-Herald Leader, and UK IMG Sports Marketing raised $404,682.
Money raised as part of the Kentucky Cares campaign will support Red Cross relief efforts in Eastern Kentucky.  "Financial support is critical as we begin transition our operation from

immediate emergency relief to more long-term recovery," said Terry Burkhart, CEO of the Bluegrass Chapter of the American Red Cross.
Over the next several days Red Cross case workers will meet one-on-one with families to explain the recovery process, help with emergency medical needs and assist those who

need help registering for other relief programs such as aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  The Red Cross will also be providing direct financial assistance to

people with verified, disaster-caused needs.
"This is a tremendous outpouring of support and we are excited to be able to help those Kentuckians who have been so greatly affected by this disaster, " Burkhart said.

CONTINUE READING…


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Nearly 11,500 Kentuckians with Alzheimer’s live Alone

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KENTUCKY (3/8/12) – Advance planning for future legal, financial and long-term care needs is critical for the estimated one in seven Americans − or 11,430 Kentuckians − diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and who still live alone, up to half of them without an identifiable caregiver, according to the Alzheimer’s Association® 2012 Facts and Figures Report, released today.
“Alzheimer’s and other dementias take our loved ones through unfamiliar territory, and advance planning in the early stages of the disease allow them to build a care team, make financial plans and prepare for future safety concerns, while they are still cognitively able to do so,” said Teri Shirk, president and CEO of the Greater Kentucky and Southern Indiana Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, which offers a variety of resources for individuals with Alzheimer’s as well as their family members and other caregivers.
States need to plan ahead as well: Today’s report projects a 500 percent increase in combined state Medicare and Medicaid spending by 2050 due to the expanding population of Alzheimer’s patients. According to the report, which found that someone in America develops Alzheimer’s every 68 seconds, as many as 6.7 million Americans will be living with the disease by 2025, including 97,000 Kentucky residents (a 31 percent increase over 2000, when 74,000 Kentuckians had Alzheimer’s). Nearly 30 percent of those with Alzheimer’s are on Medicare and Medicaid, compared to just 11 percent of those without dementia.
“Caring for people with Alzheimer’s will cost the United States an estimated $200 billion in 2012, an amount that already threatens to overwhelm federal and state budgets,” Shirk said. “Absent intervention, those costs will grow to $1.1 trillion by mid-century. Then there are the out-of-pocket costs to family caregivers, which are projected to balloon 400 percent by 2050. We simply must have a National Alzheimer’s Plan in place that establishes the resources we need to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s, and to ensure much-needed support for those with Alzheimer’s and their families.” A draft National Alzheimer’s Plan was announced February 22, and comments currently are being sought.
Other Kentucky-related statistics included in today’s report:
• The new report reveals there are 15.2 million friends and family members providing care for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, including 264,658 caregivers in Kentucky. In 2011, these caregivers provided $210 billion worth of unpaid care nationally; and $3.65 billion in Kentucky (in fact, Kentucky was one of 39 states in which unpaid caregivers provided care valued at more than $1 billion).
• The physical and emotional impact on Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers is estimated to result in nearly $9 billion in increased health care costs in the United States, including $144.6 million for caregivers in Kentucky.
• About 51,000 residents of Kentucky nursing homes in 2009 had cognitive impairments.
Other national statistics in the Alzheimer’s Association® 2012 Facts and Figures report:
• According to the Alzheimer’s Association report, there are 5.4 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease, including 5.2 million people age 65 or older and 200,000 people under the age of 65. And 45 percent of adults 85 and older have Alzheimer’s.
• Medicare payments for an older person with Alzheimer’s or other dementias are nearly three times higher, while Medicaid payments are 19 times higher than for seniors without Alzheimer’s and other dementias.
• While only 4 percent of the general population will be admitted to a nursing home by age 80, for people with Alzheimer’s, 75 percent will be admitted to a nursing home by age 80, posing significant economic challenges to state Medicaid budgets.
• Most people survive an average of four to eight years after an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis, but some can live as long as 20 years with the disease.
• Of family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, 61 percent rated their emotional stress of caregiving as high or very high.
Alzheimer’s Association’s Facts and Figures
The Alzheimer’s Association’s Facts and Figures report is a comprehensive compilation of national statistics and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. The report conveys the impact of Alzheimer’s on individuals, families, government, and the nation’s healthcare system. Since its 2007 inaugural release, the report has become the most cited source covering the broad spectrum of Alzheimer’s issues. The Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report is an official publication of the Alzheimer’s Association®.
SurfKY News
Information provided by Danielle Waller

CONTINUE READING…


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Lawmakers promote hemp as cash crop in Kentucky Associated Press

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FRANKFORT, Ky. — Lawmakers have grown bolder in their push to allow farmers to grow hemp in Kentucky, a Bible-belt state where the issue was once considered politically taboo.

Growing hemp is illegal under federal law, but supporters want to lift the state ban with hopes of Kentucky becoming a leading grower of the versatile crop if the federal ban is lifted.

The House Agriculture and Small Business Committee held a hearing Wednesday on two bills pending in the state Legislature. Neither bill was called for a vote.

Most Kentucky political leaders have dismissed the issue in the past because of fears that voters might somehow conclude that they’re also pro-marijuana. But the issue was a centerpiece in last year’s race for agriculture commissioner, which was won decisively by Jamie Comer, a hemp proponent.

Comer said growing industrial hemp would allow expansion of Kentucky farm markets and create jobs in rural communities.

Industrial hemp, a cousin to marijuana, is used to make fuel, cattle feed, textiles, paper, lotion, cosmetics and other products. Though it contains trace amounts of the mind-altering chemical tetrahydrocannabinol that makes marijuana intoxicating, it remains illegal in the U.S.

Ed Shemelya, regional marijuana coordinator in the Appalachian High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, said police continue to oppose legalization of hemp because there’s no way to visually distinguish it from marijuana.

“It’s an enforcement nightmare,” Shemelya said.

State Rep. Keith Hall, D-Phelps, said he believes people are beginning to realize the potential economic value of hemp and that is allowing political leaders to feel more comfortable in promoting it.

“I would say today that the issue is fear, and the great President Roosevelt said ‘what do we have to fear but fear itself,”’ Hall said.

Hall said people might think it odd that “a Bible-read man” would speak in favor of allowing Kentucky farmers to grow hemp.

“They’re saying the best Bibles are made with hemp paper over in France, because they don’t yellow; they don’t tear; they don’t tarnish,” he said.

Sen. Joey Pendleton, D-Hopkinsville, said he expects the federal government will lift the ban on hemp production in the future, and that he wants Kentucky to be ready to plant the crop as soon as that happens.

Kentucky has an ideal climate for hemp production and during World War II it was a leading grower of the plant that produces strong fibers used in fabrics, ropes and other materials for the military.

CONTINUE READING…


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LSD as treatment for alcoholism? Norway scientists looking at hallucinogen therapy

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Writing in Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers note drug gives insight into problems

 

By Lindsay Goldwert / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Friday, March 9, 2012, 11:56 AM
LSD (which sometimes comes in the form of sheets of stamps, l.) is being looked at as an aid in combating alcoholism.

Turn on, tune in… stop drinking?

A group of Norwegian scientists believe that there could be a benefit to treating alcoholism with lysergic acid diethylamide, better known as LSD.

In the 1960s and 1970s, reseachers experimented with treating mostly male patients with low doses of the hallucinogen and recorded the results. The trials revealed positive outcomes but the treatment never caught on.

Decades later, the neuroscientists from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology decided to take a second look at the data.

The results were surprisingly encouraging.

On average, 59% of LSD patients and 38% of control patients who were confirmed to suffer from alcoholism showed improvement.

"It was rather common for patients to claim significant insights into their problems, to feel that they had been given a new lease on life, and to make a strong resolution to discontinue their drinking,” the researchers noted in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

There was also a similar beneficial effect on maintained abstinence from alcohol.

LSD interacts with a specific type of serotonin receptors in the brain, which may stimulate new connections and open the mind for new perspectives and possibilities.

“Given the evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD on alcoholism, it is puzzling why this treatment approach has been largely overlooked," says researcher Pal-Orjan Johansen.

The study authors concluded that one of the problems with the original studies is lack of patients to definitely prove that there was a positive outcome.

It was also tough for scientists to gain approval for LSD drug trials since the drug was declared a controlled substance with Schedule I status in 1970.

Scientists have also been analyzing the benefits of psilocybin or “magic mushrooms” on patients with depression.

Psilocybin seems to affect the medial prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that is hyperactive in people who suffer from depression, reports Reuters.

Ketamine, a drug which gained popularity during the rave scene of the 1990s, has also been touted for helping patients suffering from extreme forms of depression.

Read more:


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Your morning jolt: Pat Robertson endorses legal marijuana

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9:40 am March 9, 2012, by jgalloway

Gov. Nathan Deal has found an unlikely ally in his push to refigure who we lock up in Georgia: The Rev. Pat Robertson, who now backs the legalization of marijuana. From the New York Times:

“I really believe we should treat marijuana the way we treat beverage alcohol,” Mr. Robertson said in an interview …. “I’ve never used marijuana and I don’t intend to, but it’s just one of those things that I think: this war on drugs just hasn’t succeeded.”

Mr. Robertson’s remarks echoed statements he made last week on “The 700 Club,” the signature program of his Christian Broadcasting Network, and other comments he made in 2010. While those earlier remarks were largely dismissed by his followers, Mr. Robertson has now apparently fully embraced the idea of legalizing marijuana, arguing that it is a way to bring down soaring rates of incarceration and reduce the social and financial costs.

“I believe in working with the hearts of people, and not locking them up,” he said.

Here’s a YouTube clip of remarks Robertson made along the same line last year, caught by CNN:

***

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2DRk5JVTRE&w=448&h=252&hd=1]
Pat Robertson discusses legalizing marijuana

CONTINUE READING…


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Hemp could make a comeback

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By Kevin Wheatley

about 23 hours ago

Industrial hemp could make a comeback as one of Kentucky’s top cash crops if lawmakers legalize the harvest of marijuana’s botanical cousin, legislators have told a House committee.

The Agricultural and Small Business Committee on Wednesday heard from key sponsors of two pieces of legislation –House bills 272 and 286 – that would make hemp a legal crop if the federal government lifts restrictions on it.

The bills didn’t come to a vote, but Rep. Tom McKee, a Cynthiana Democrat and the committee’s chairman, said the discussion would continue so both sides of the argument could be heard.

Sponsors spoke for about 30 minutes, highlighting primarily the many legal products produced by industrial hemp, such as textiles, paper, auto plastics, rope, construction material, cosmetics and feed for cattle.

The trickle-down effect would create 17,000 jobs and result in an economic impact between $400 million and $500 million, said Sen. Joey Pendleton, D-Hopkinsville, quoting a University of Kentucky survey from years ago.

“We’re sitting on the cutting edge and, to me, on a gold mine here of what we can do in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to create jobs and to give our agriculture people another opportunity to grow something,” he said.

Eighty-five percent of industrial hemp produced in Canada is shipped to the U.S., and China sends a large amount here as well, Pendleton added.

He also noted that Kentucky has an ideal climate and was a top hemp producer prior to and during World War II until the federal government banned it amid political pressure from nylon and paper manufacturers in the 1950s.

While there’s concern that hemp would be confused with marijuana, Pendleton said the two plants can be distinguished easily and cross-pollination between the two plants decreases tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient in marijuana.

However, Ed Shemelya, regional marijuana coordinator in the Appalachian High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, disagreed and said police continue to oppose legalization of hemp because there’s no way to visually distinguish it from marijuana.

“It’s an enforcement nightmare,” Shemelya said after the meeting.

Rep. Keith Hall, D-Phelps, said hemp oil could be explored as an alternative fuel source. He noted that Henry Ford built his first automobile using hemp products and ran it on hemp diesel fuel.

Bio-diesel fuel produced from hemp emits no sulfur when it’s used, making it the only fuel that passes the Environment Protection Agency’s Clear Air Act, Hall said.

Hemp plants could also be used on mine reclamation sites as they soak up contaminants, he said.

Legislators have been hesitant to consider legalizing hemp with its link to marijuana, but Hall said the potential economic impact has thawed some, but not all, concerns.

“I would say today that the issue is fear,” Hall told the panel.

Rep. Terry Mills, D-Lebanon, said 66 percent of his constituents support legalizing industrial hemp.

“… The ag economy is the best its been in 40 years, and we’re seeing that in grain and cattle prices, but we always need diversity in agriculture,” Mills said.

“If this can be developed as a viable crop in agriculture, it can only help the agriculture community and, again, those people who live out in rural Kentucky.”

It’s unclear how much support the bills have on the House committee, but two members –Rep. Fred Nesler, D-Mayfield, and Rep. Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow –commended sponsors for speaking about the issue.

“I look forward to future discussion,” Nesler said. “I hope we don’t just drag this issue like sometimes we do. This is an issue that almost seems too sensible.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

CONTINUE READING ….


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The 1918 “Flu Pandemic” was in fact an act of war upon the U.S. by the German’s…

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Category: Sheree Krider

Published Date Written by Sheree Krider

1918 F L U  P A N D E M I C….

Thru this link is a piece of history that has been all but forgotten. 

The 1918 Flu Pandemic was not your usual air borne "flu".  It was in fact an act of war by Germany upon the American people.

 

Read the first chapter for free thru this link. My Grandmother died at age 23 in 1919 when my Father was two years old of this
horrid plague which was in fact a weapon of war started by the Germans in 1918. Created and brought to the USA via U-Boats
which landed in the Boston Harbor, in vials which were sneaked out in the dark of night and let loose in crowds of people.
An eyewitness, an elderly woman, said she saw a "greasy looking cloud which crept over the harbor"…

"The fascinating, true story of the world’s deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight.

An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American sold…"

Martin Osborne writes: I watch a program which showed that the Americans retrieved the original virus from frozen bodies in the arctic ??
Sheree Krider: I sure would like to have a link to that!
Sheree Krider: And I would not doubt it for a moment.
Martin Osborne: Don’t have a link for you but it’s well documented that they have used these samples to produce the original virus,you can probably google it.

They have also patented cannabinoids that counteract the virus.

Robert Melamede has also mentioned that cannabinoids can protect you from it.The US goverment is patenting lots of parts of the cannabis plant.

Sheree Krider

This post is dedicated to my Grandmother Anna May Fackler (who died of this pandemic in 1919) and Grandfather Eugene Abraham Hardesty…

BE SURE TO READ THE FIRST CHAPTER THRU THE LINK – IT IS FREE.

THIS SHOULD NEVER BE FORGOTTEN AND SHOULD BE TAUGHT TO OUR CHILDREN!

Kentucky

Influenza first appeared in Kentucky about September 27th. On that date, troops traveling from Texas on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad stopped off in Bowling Green.

There, soldiers left the train to explore the city. They infected several local citizens before returning to the train and traveling on.

A black and white panoramic, aerial view of a portion of the state of Kentucky.

Base Hospital, Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. [Credit: The Library of Congress]

When the flu appeared in Louisville, local officials did not submit a report for the cases which they had. Yet the situation in Louisville clearly dire, as the Public Health Service calculated that the city had about 1,000 cases during late September. The decision by the PHS to calculate Louisville’s figures is unusual. Generally, the PHS did not calculate mortality or morbidity numbers for different cities. Their decision to do do for Lousville probably indicates that there were a significant number of cases in the city by that time.

By the second and third week of the epidemic, Louisville was experiencing about 180 deaths a week from influenza. The situation continued to be bad throughout the fall and into December. On December 12th, a local health officer sent a telegram to Surgeon General Rupert Blue requesting that the PHS take charge of the city until the epidemic passed.

A military camp located near Louisville, Camp Taylor, was harder hit than the city itself. This was because the disease tended to strike younger people more aggressively. Enlisted men at the camp totaled approximately 40,000 soldiers. These men were from Kentucky and Indiana. During the week of October 19th, there were 3,772 cases at Camp Taylor alone, which would indicate an extremely high rate of infection.

A black and white panoramic, aerial view of Camp Zachary Taylor in Kentucky.

Camp Zachary Taylor. (Spelled) by placing soldiers in shape of letters] c.1919 [Credit: The Library of Congress]

Lexington was not as hard hit as other areas of the state. It was, for example, significantly less hard hit than Louisville. However, the situation there, as across the state, was still serious. On October 6th, the Kentucky state board was forced to issue a state-wide proclamation closing "all places of amusement, schools, churches and other places of assembly."

Overall, the PHS said that "the situation in central and western Kentucky remained good but…the situation in Carter, Breathitt and Harlan Counties and around the mining camps was bad."

In Webster County, Doy Lee Lovan said that the impact of the flu epidemic was especially dramatic as it was combined with a smallpox epidemic there. One person from every house on his street died as a result of one disease or the other.

In Pike County, Kentucky, a miner noted that "It was the saddest lookin’ time then that ever you saw in your life. My brother lived over there in the camps then and I was working over there and I was dropping cars onto the team pole. And that, that epidemic broke out and people went to dyin’ and there just four and five dyin’ every night dyin’ right there in the camps, every night. And I began goin’ over there, my brother and all his family took down with it, what’d they call it, the flu? Yeah, 1918 flu. And, uh, when I’d get over there I’d ride my horse and, and go over there in the evening and I’d stay with my brother about three hours and do what I could to help ’em. And every one of them was in the bed and sometimes Doctor Preston would come while I was there, he was the doctor. And he said "I’m a tryin’ to save their lives but I’m afraid I’m not going to."And they were so bad off. And, and every, nearly every porch, every porch that I’d look at had–would have a casket box a sittin’ on it. And men a diggin’ graves just as hard as they could and the mines had to shut down there wasn’t a nary a man, there wasn’t a, there wasn’t a mine arunnin’ a lump of coal or runnin’ no work. Stayed that away for about six weeks."

The pandemic peaked in the fall of 1918 but influenza remained prevalent throughout the state during the winter and spring of 1919.

Anton Casimir Dilger (13 February 1884 – 17 October 1918) was a German-American physician and the main proponent of the German biological warfare sabotage program during World War I. His father, Hubert Dilger, was a United States Army captain who had won the Medal of Honor for his work as an artilleryman at the Battle of Chancellorsville (1863) during the American Civil War.[1]

America was the only target of German biological sabotage to which Dilger traveled, but Romania, Norway, Spain, and South America were all wartime targets. Dilger was the only known individual with the required medical knowledge to have presided over the program in Germany, even if he was not directly involved with each country. The methods of inoculating livestock became more advanced as the war progressed, going from crude needles to capillary tubes of bacterial culture hidden inside sugar cubes.

The effects of the German effort to sabotage neutral support of Allied countries is unknown. No reports have been made of disease outbreaks among livestock, so it is not yet known whether the cultures used were pathogenic or even viable. Certainly the unprofessional method in which the U.S. stevedores inoculated horses would have given rise to accidents, but none are reported. That alone is cause for suspicion among researchers of the cultures used. Indeed, in the war treaties signed in the wake of World War I, no specific provisions were made for the prohibition of biological warfare, so it is presumed that officials either did not know about the German effort, or did not consider it a serious threat.

*

http://elliotlakenews.wordpress.com/2006/1…h-flu-man-made/
By Henry Makow Ph.D.
In 1948 Heinrich Mueller, the former head of the Gestapo, told his CIA Interrogator that the most devastating plague in human history was man-made.
He was referring to the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 that infected 20% of the world’s population and killed between 60 and 100 million people. This is roughly 3 times as many as were killed and wounded in World War One, and is comparable to WWII losses, yet this modern plague has slipped down the memory hole.Mueller said the flu started as a US army bacteriological warfare weapon that somehow infected US army ranks at Camp Riley KS in March 1918, and spread around the world. He says that it “got out of control” but we cannot discount the horrible possibility that the “Spanish Flu” was a deliberate elite depopulation measure, and that it could be used again. Researchers have found connections between it and the current “Bird Flu.”
At a 1944 Nazi bacteriological warfare conference in Berlin, General Walter Schreiber, Chief of the Medical Corps of the German Army told Mueller that he had spent two months in the US in 1927 conferring with his counterparts. They told him that the “so-called double blow virus” (i.e. Spanish Flu) was developed and used during the 1914 war. “But,” according to Mueller, “it got out of control and instead of killing the Germans who had surrendered by then, it turned back on you, and nearly everybody else.” (”Gestapo Chief: The 1948 CIA Interrogation of Heinrich Mueller” Vol. 2 by Gregory Douglas, p. 106)

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The 1918 “Flu Pandemic” was in fact an act of war upon the U.S. by the German’s…

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Category: Sheree Krider

Published Date Written by Sheree Krider

1918 F L U  P A N D E M I C….

Thru this link is a piece of history that has been all but forgotten. 

The 1918 Flu Pandemic was not your usual air borne "flu".  It was in fact an act of war by Germany upon the American people.

 

Read the first chapter for free thru this link. My Grandmother died at age 23 in 1919 when my Father was two years old of this
horrid plague which was in fact a weapon of war started by the Germans in 1918. Created and brought to the USA via U-Boats
which landed in the Boston Harbor, in vials which were sneaked out in the dark of night and let loose in crowds of people.
An eyewitness, an elderly woman, said she saw a "greasy looking cloud which crept over the harbor"…

"The fascinating, true story of the world’s deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight.

An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American sold…"

Martin Osborne writes: I watch a program which showed that the Americans retrieved the original virus from frozen bodies in the arctic ??
Sheree Krider: I sure would like to have a link to that!
Sheree Krider: And I would not doubt it for a moment.
Martin Osborne: Don’t have a link for you but it’s well documented that they have used these samples to produce the original virus,you can probably google it.

They have also patented cannabinoids that counteract the virus.

Robert Melamede has also mentioned that cannabinoids can protect you from it.The US goverment is patenting lots of parts of the cannabis plant.

Sheree Krider

This post is dedicated to my Grandmother Anna May Fackler (who died of this pandemic in 1919) and Grandfather Eugene Abraham Hardesty…

BE SURE TO READ THE FIRST CHAPTER THRU THE LINK – IT IS FREE.

THIS SHOULD NEVER BE FORGOTTEN AND SHOULD BE TAUGHT TO OUR CHILDREN!

Kentucky

Influenza first appeared in Kentucky about September 27th. On that date, troops traveling from Texas on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad stopped off in Bowling Green.

There, soldiers left the train to explore the city. They infected several local citizens before returning to the train and traveling on.

A black and white panoramic, aerial view of a portion of the state of Kentucky.

Base Hospital, Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. [Credit: The Library of Congress]

When the flu appeared in Louisville, local officials did not submit a report for the cases which they had. Yet the situation in Louisville clearly dire, as the Public Health Service calculated that the city had about 1,000 cases during late September. The decision by the PHS to calculate Louisville’s figures is unusual. Generally, the PHS did not calculate mortality or morbidity numbers for different cities. Their decision to do do for Lousville probably indicates that there were a significant number of cases in the city by that time.

By the second and third week of the epidemic, Louisville was experiencing about 180 deaths a week from influenza. The situation continued to be bad throughout the fall and into December. On December 12th, a local health officer sent a telegram to Surgeon General Rupert Blue requesting that the PHS take charge of the city until the epidemic passed.

A military camp located near Louisville, Camp Taylor, was harder hit than the city itself. This was because the disease tended to strike younger people more aggressively. Enlisted men at the camp totaled approximately 40,000 soldiers. These men were from Kentucky and Indiana. During the week of October 19th, there were 3,772 cases at Camp Taylor alone, which would indicate an extremely high rate of infection.

A black and white panoramic, aerial view of Camp Zachary Taylor in Kentucky.

Camp Zachary Taylor. (Spelled) by placing soldiers in shape of letters] c.1919 [Credit: The Library of Congress]

Lexington was not as hard hit as other areas of the state. It was, for example, significantly less hard hit than Louisville. However, the situation there, as across the state, was still serious. On October 6th, the Kentucky state board was forced to issue a state-wide proclamation closing "all places of amusement, schools, churches and other places of assembly."

Overall, the PHS said that "the situation in central and western Kentucky remained good but…the situation in Carter, Breathitt and Harlan Counties and around the mining camps was bad."

In Webster County, Doy Lee Lovan said that the impact of the flu epidemic was especially dramatic as it was combined with a smallpox epidemic there. One person from every house on his street died as a result of one disease or the other.

In Pike County, Kentucky, a miner noted that "It was the saddest lookin’ time then that ever you saw in your life. My brother lived over there in the camps then and I was working over there and I was dropping cars onto the team pole. And that, that epidemic broke out and people went to dyin’ and there just four and five dyin’ every night dyin’ right there in the camps, every night. And I began goin’ over there, my brother and all his family took down with it, what’d they call it, the flu? Yeah, 1918 flu. And, uh, when I’d get over there I’d ride my horse and, and go over there in the evening and I’d stay with my brother about three hours and do what I could to help ’em. And every one of them was in the bed and sometimes Doctor Preston would come while I was there, he was the doctor. And he said "I’m a tryin’ to save their lives but I’m afraid I’m not going to."And they were so bad off. And, and every, nearly every porch, every porch that I’d look at had–would have a casket box a sittin’ on it. And men a diggin’ graves just as hard as they could and the mines had to shut down there wasn’t a nary a man, there wasn’t a, there wasn’t a mine arunnin’ a lump of coal or runnin’ no work. Stayed that away for about six weeks."

The pandemic peaked in the fall of 1918 but influenza remained prevalent throughout the state during the winter and spring of 1919.

Anton Casimir Dilger (13 February 1884 – 17 October 1918) was a German-American physician and the main proponent of the German biological warfare sabotage program during World War I. His father, Hubert Dilger, was a United States Army captain who had won the Medal of Honor for his work as an artilleryman at the Battle of Chancellorsville (1863) during the American Civil War.[1]

America was the only target of German biological sabotage to which Dilger traveled, but Romania, Norway, Spain, and South America were all wartime targets. Dilger was the only known individual with the required medical knowledge to have presided over the program in Germany, even if he was not directly involved with each country. The methods of inoculating livestock became more advanced as the war progressed, going from crude needles to capillary tubes of bacterial culture hidden inside sugar cubes.

The effects of the German effort to sabotage neutral support of Allied countries is unknown. No reports have been made of disease outbreaks among livestock, so it is not yet known whether the cultures used were pathogenic or even viable. Certainly the unprofessional method in which the U.S. stevedores inoculated horses would have given rise to accidents, but none are reported. That alone is cause for suspicion among researchers of the cultures used. Indeed, in the war treaties signed in the wake of World War I, no specific provisions were made for the prohibition of biological warfare, so it is presumed that officials either did not know about the German effort, or did not consider it a serious threat.

*

http://elliotlakenews.wordpress.com/2006/1…h-flu-man-made/
By Henry Makow Ph.D.
In 1948 Heinrich Mueller, the former head of the Gestapo, told his CIA Interrogator that the most devastating plague in human history was man-made.
He was referring to the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 that infected 20% of the world’s population and killed between 60 and 100 million people. This is roughly 3 times as many as were killed and wounded in World War One, and is comparable to WWII losses, yet this modern plague has slipped down the memory hole.Mueller said the flu started as a US army bacteriological warfare weapon that somehow infected US army ranks at Camp Riley KS in March 1918, and spread around the world. He says that it “got out of control” but we cannot discount the horrible possibility that the “Spanish Flu” was a deliberate elite depopulation measure, and that it could be used again. Researchers have found connections between it and the current “Bird Flu.”
At a 1944 Nazi bacteriological warfare conference in Berlin, General Walter Schreiber, Chief of the Medical Corps of the German Army told Mueller that he had spent two months in the US in 1927 conferring with his counterparts. They told him that the “so-called double blow virus” (i.e. Spanish Flu) was developed and used during the 1914 war. “But,” according to Mueller, “it got out of control and instead of killing the Germans who had surrendered by then, it turned back on you, and nearly everybody else.” (”Gestapo Chief: The 1948 CIA Interrogation of Heinrich Mueller” Vol. 2 by Gregory Douglas, p. 106)

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Pending industrial hemp legislation could go to pot

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By Brad Bowman

Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 6:19 pm

Two bills in state legislation for the legalization of industrial hemp could offer a transition crop for farmers in Nelson County.  Central Kentucky was the largest producer of hemp during World War II for rope production, but state officials say it isn’t legislation but law enforcement that will decide hemp’s future in the state or Nelson County.

Hemp has been looked at as alternative energy source in the past, according to Nelson County Extension Agent, Ron Bowman.

“If it was feasible at all, we would have to be closer to the actual power plants,” Bowman said. “It all depends on the price of the product, what would it cost to ship it and whether our farmers can actually make money from it.”

Industrial hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant. Given its low THC content, it would not be attractive as a recreational drug like marijuana, but the stigma has helped stop its legalization.

Hemp studies have been initiated in the past, but the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration denied permits to the Dean of University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture Scott Smith.

“There are advocates on both sides of the issue,” Smith said. “The ultimate question is whether hemp is an economic solution for farmers.”

There isn’t sufficient research on industrial hemp to discern whether it is economically viable for farmers, according to Smith. Research exists in Canada and Europe for production, but not the market research needed in the U.S., according to Smith. When the University of Kentucky and Kentucky State University were encouraged to research hemp production, Smith was denied by the DEA.

“We have studies on switch back grass and miscanthus grass which could be just as productive as hemp for an energy source, but we just don’t know enough about it,” Smith said.

Hemp could be the transition crop for local Nelson County tobacco farmers if research could support the crop as an economical and marketable product.

“There are a lot of unanswered questions out there about whether it is right for our farmers. If it can be used in all the different ways people claim that it can, farmers are interested,” State Sen. Jimmy Higdon said. “We need the universities to research it and show that it can work, but we need law enforcement on board to make this happen.”

The bills would require farmers to be licensed by the Department of Agriculture and pass a criminal history check by local sheriffs. Sheriffs would do random test inspections of hemp fields at a fee of $5 per acre with a minimum $150 fee. The money would be divided between the sheriff and agriculture departments.

The transition crop couldn’t come soon enough for farming families looking for an alternative to tobacco, according to State Rep., David Floyd.

“It’s a fact that we need to move tobacco farmers toward another crop,” Floyd said. “A lot has been taken away from tobacco farmers. Years ago, tobacco fields put their children through school. “

Industrial hemp is considered a controlled substance by the DEA. Bound by international treaty laws, the DEA can only legally grant one entity the permit to research cannabis in any form, according to DEA Public Relations Officer Barbara Carreno in Washington D.C. The University of Mississippi currently possesses the permit.

“Our main concern is security. We have security requirements that must be met in regards to researching controlled substances,” Carreno said. “The university is required by law to regularly publish reports for compliance with security and research.”

The permit is just one part of the process for legal research by any entity. The National Institute on Drug Abuse oversees the approval process, which requires the reports from an approved research group. The DEA doesn’t approve or disapprove research, Carreno said.

States that have legalized medicinal marijuana are operating in violation of federal law. North Dakota has sued the DEA for the right to grow industrial hemp, Carreno said. The lack of legal research confuses the issue of industrial hemp and street marijuana sought after by drug users.

“Hemp is long and spindle-like,” Smith said. “There is an argument that cross pollination would render an illegal plant grown in the same field with less than desirable levels of THC, but we don’t have the research to support that.”

The profitability of industrial hemp and the legal hurdles to produce the crop isn’t lost on Kentucky Agricultural Commissioner James Comer.

“The U.S. is the only country that doesn’t grow industrial hemp. North Dakota is suing the DEA because they can see the money being made in Canada,” Comer said. “We will continue to educate people statewide to address the misinformation and the potential it has for our agricultural economy.”

It is a cheaper crop for farmers to put out than crops such as corn grown for ethanol and it is greener. Industrial hemp doesn’t require fertilizer, Comer said.

The crop could produce a significant contribution to the agriculture economy. It wouldn’t be just an opportunity for farmers but the state, according to Comer.

“This could create manufacturing jobs. We have companies that would come here for manufacturing greener products to replace plastic for the automotive industry such as car dashes,” Comer said.

The commissioner maintains an optimistic stance on the legality issues surrounding industrial hemp and its classification. U.S. Representative for Texas’s 14th congressional district, Ron Paul’s introduction of H.R. 1831 would take industrial hemp out of the jurisdiction of the DEA by declassifying it as a controlled substance, according to Comer.

“This is truly a bipartisan issue,” Comer said. “Everyone from the far right to the far left is on board to make this happen. We have to look ahead and we have everything we need without asking for money or raising taxes.”

BRAD BOWMAN can be reached at bbowman@lcni.com


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