Trump Says He Can Ignore Medical Marijuana Protections Passed By Congress

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President Trump Signs VA Accountability Act

December 21, 2019

Tom Angell

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

In a statement attached to a large-scale funding bill he signed into law on Friday, President Trump said in effect that he reserves the right to ignore a congressionally approved provision that seeks to protect state medical marijuana laws from federal interference.

Division B, section 531 of the Act provides that the Department of Justice may not use any funds made available under this Act to prevent implementation of medical marijuana laws by various States and territories,” Trump wrote in a signing statement. “My Administration will treat this provision consistent with the President’s constitutional responsibility to faithfully execute the laws of the United States.”

Although the vague language doesn’t directly say he plans to ignore Congress’s will to block Justice Department prosecution of medical cannabis patients and providers, presidents typically use signing statements such as this one to flag provisions of laws they are enacting which they believe could impede on their executive authorities. By calling out the medical marijuana rider, Trump is making clear that his administration believes it can broadly enforce federal drug laws against people complying with state medical marijuana laws even though Congress told him not to.

But it doesn’t necessarily mean that a crackdown is on the way.

The administration hasn’t carried out any major enforcement activities against state-legal marijuana businesses since taking office, in accordance with Trump’s campaign pledges that he would respect the right of states to enact their own cannabis laws without federal interference. That also goes for recreational policies and businesses that aren’t even covered under the congressionally adopted rider, which has been part of federal law since 2014.

It is the third time Trump has said in a signing statement that his administration doesn’t necessarily have to abide by the medical marijuana provision. He included similar language when signing off on annual appropriations bills last year and in 2017, though he did not do so in 2018.

In August, the president reiterated his support for letting states legalize cannabis without federal interference.

“It’s a very big subject and right now we are allowing states to make that decision,” Trump said. “A lot of states are making that decision, but we’re allowing states to make that decision.”

Last year, when asked about separate pending congressional legislation that would more broadly exempt state-legal marijuana activity from the federal Controlled Substances Act, he said he “really” supports the bill.

Given the president’s consistently voiced support for respecting state cannabis laws, it’s not clear why he has gone out of his way to reserve his right to ignore the medical marijuana rider on a near-annual basis.

Among the handful of other provisions Trump singled out in his new signing statement are ones dealing with the closing the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, restrictions on diplomatic activities and the dissemination of information that may be protected by executive privilege.

The Fiscal Year 2020 funding bill that Trump signed into law on Friday does not contain a broader rider seeking to shield all state marijuana laws—including those that allow recreational use and sales—that had been approved by the House of Representatives earlier this year. It, along with another provision that would have protected banks that serve state-legal cannabis businesses from federal punishment, was dropped from the final legislation in bicameral negotiations with the Senate.

Congressional leaders did include several cannabis-related provisions in a report attached to the legislation, though, such as language directing the Food and Drug Administration to formulate a policy of enforcement discretion for CBD products and requiring the National Institute on Drug Abuse to compile a report on the barriers that the Schedule I status of drugs including marijuana places in front of scientific research.

CONTINUE READING…

RELATED:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/statement-by-the-president-33/?utm_source=link&utm_medium=header

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2014/01/02/on-legalization-when-the-u-n-comes-a-marching-along-we-will-all-be-singing-a-brand-new-song/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2014/10/15/lets-talk-about-corporate-cannabis/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/05/08/and-all-the-green-fields-will-runneth-red-with-blood/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/07/09/conflicting-federal-laws-beg-to-differ-on-marijuana-enforcement/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/


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Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to All!

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USMjParty Christmas 2019

Praying for PEACE on EARTH,

Good Will to ALL,

That OUR Nation will HEAL,

Once and FOR ALL,

Let COMPASSION light your way,

Every single DAY,

LOVE ALL your Brothers and Sisters,

Because OUR FATHER intended it that way,

Do not forget those most FORGOTTEN,

On this day of remembrance,

Embrace one another,

AND

Pray for PEACE,

To OUR Heavenly Father,

Whose day of birth, which we celebrate,

By giving “presents” to each other?

It’s time that we, as his Children,

Give the gift to OUR Father….

PEACE to ALL

and

ALL for PEACE!

Much LOVE to ALL,

No matter your beliefs!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!


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Decatur police training officers to draw blood for marijuana testing

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by: Cole Henke

Posted: Dec 16, 2019 / 12:33 PM CST / Updated: Dec 16, 2019 / 12:33 PM CST

DECATUR, Ill. (NEXSTAR) — Police across the state are looking for an admissible test, like a breathalyzer, to test for those driving high, once marijuana is legalized.

Until then, Decatur police will use a different method. They will test your blood.

The officers began their training last year, well before the state legalized pot.

If an officer suspects someone is driving high, they can bring them in, and if the person gives permission they can draw their blood for testing. The tests would check for THC content, rather than traces of marijuana. THC leaves the blood much quicker, signs of the drug as a whole, which can stay in the blood for weeks.

The person who was pulled over can refuse the blood test, but that has consequences similar to refusing to take a breathalyzer test.

Sangamon County Jack Campbell said he will not be training any of his officers in phlebotomy. He does believe that there needs to be a test, or else law enforcement won’t be able to curtail what he expects to be a substantial uptick in DUI’s.

So far, Decatur police have only trained a few officers to draw blood. The process is expensive, but as more money becomes available, they said they will send more to training.

That won’t be the only new method Decatur police will be using to patrol the streets. The Decatur Police Department received a $500,000 donation from the Howard Buffett foundation. That money will be used to hire a new officer that is solely focused on catching drivers who are under the influence.

CONTINUE READING AND VIDEO!

My comment:

So this is legalization?  …and freedom to use recreational Cannabis? ….

The Government effectively owns your body and your mind.  You have absolutely no privacy.  Even if a crime has not been committed you are guilty until you can manage to prove yourself not guilty….Just think what this could lead to….in effect already has.  Blood testing is really not a new thing…to prove intoxication.

LEGALIZE = LEGAL LIES…

BEWARE OF NEW “LEGALIZATION” LAWS…THEY ARE NOT OUT TO GIVE YOU FREEDOM – THEY ARE OUT TO CONTROL YOU AND CAGE YOU!

sk


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Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

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24818176-marijuana-laws-marijuana-plants-jpg

From Board of Governors Federal Reserve System

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

December 3, 2019 

WASHINGTON-Four federal agencies in conjunction with the state bank regulators today issued a statement clarifying the legal status of hemp growth and production and the relevant requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) for banks providing services to hemp-related businesses.

The statement emphasizes that banks are no longer required to file suspicious activity reports (SAR) for customers solely because they are engaged in the growth or cultivation of hemp in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. For hemp-related customers, banks are expected to follow standard SAR procedures, and file a SAR if indicia of suspicious activity warrants.

This statement provides banks with background information on the legal status of hemp, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) interim final rule on the production of hemp, and the BSA considerations when providing banking services to hemp-related businesses.

This statement also indicates that the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) will issue additional guidance after further reviewing and evaluating the USDA interim final rule.

The statement was issued by the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FinCEN, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors. Banks can contact the USDA, state departments of agriculture, and tribal governments with further questions regarding the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) and its implementing regulations.

Joint Guidance on Providing Financial Services to Customers Engaged in Hemp-Related Businesses (PDF)

For Federal Reserve Board media inquiries please contact Darren Gersh at 202-452-2955.

Source Link


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House Judiciary Passes MORE Act to Decriminalize Marijuana at Federal Level

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Nov 20, 2019

Washington, D.C. –Today, the House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 3884, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, by a vote of 24-10. The MORE Act is one of the most comprehensive marijuana reforms bills ever introduced in the U.S. Congress. The MORE Act aims to correct the historical injustices of failed drug policies that have disproportionately impacted communities of color and low-income communities by decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level, reassessing marijuana convictions, and investing in local communities. U.S. Senator Kamala Harris introduced the companion bill in the Senate.

Yesterday, Chairman Nadler and other Members of Congress held a press conference to highlight the legislation. Watch here.

“I have long believed that the criminalization of marijuana has been a mistake, and the racially disparate enforcement of marijuana laws has only compounded this mistake,” said Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY). “While states have led the way in reform, our federal laws have not kept pace with the obvious need for change. With the passage of the MORE Act today, the Judiciary Committee has taken long overdue steps to address the devastating injustices caused by the War on Drugs and to finally decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.”
“As more states legalize marijuana, millions of Americans with marijuana-related convictions continue to face overwhelming barriers to jobs, education, and housing,” said Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA). “That is why we must act to remove the burden of marijuana convictions and make sure these individuals have the support needed to move forward. It is also critical that everyone — especially people of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the War on Drugs — has a real opportunity to participate in this growing industry. This is a matter of racial and economic justice. I am grateful for Chairman Nadler’s partnership on this issue and for his leadership in moving this legislation forward. I look forward to the House of Representatives passing our legislation soon.”

“This is an incredible step forward in righting the wrongs of the failed and racist War on Drugs. The federal government has lagged behind as states continue to modernize how we regulate and decriminalize cannabis. As Co-Chair of the bipartisan Cannabis Caucus, I’ll keep pushing to ensure Congress makes our cannabis policies are fair, equitable, and inclusive,” said Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA). “I applaud Chairman Nadler for his leadership, and look forward to seeing the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment & Expungement (MORE) Act get a vote on the House floor.”

“This will be one of the most historic events in our movement,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR). “The MORE Act is the most comprehensive cannabis legislation to date. I am proud to have worked with Chairman Nadler to develop this bill and applaud his leadership to bring it in front of the committee. This is a major step forward. We are making outstanding progress in our blueprint to end the federal prohibition of cannabis and address the injustice brought on by the war on drugs.”

“With today’s mark-up of the MORE Act, the United States is coming one step closer to ending the devastating harms of marijuana prohibition, which have fallen so heavily on Black and Brown people,” said Maria McFarland Sanchez-Moreno, Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “This legislation won’t make up for the full scale of harm that prohibition has caused to its victims. It’s not going to return anyone their lost dreams, time lost at the mercy of the criminal justice system; or the years spent away from their families. But this legislation is the closest we’ve come yet to not only ending those harms at the federal level, but also beginning to repair them. Now it’s up to Congress to do the right thing and swiftly pass the bill to ensure justice is not delayed a moment longer.”
“We’re thrilled that House Judiciary made history today by voting the MORE Act out of Committee,” said Ed Chung, Vice President for Criminal Justice Reform at American Progress. “This represents a significant victory for marijuana reform and for communities of color that have borne the brunt of this country’s punitive drug enforcement policies. The House must build on today’s momentum and swiftly move the MORE Act to the floor for a vote from the full body. Congress has an extraordinary opportunity to ensure equity leads today’s marijuana reform policy.”

“The House Judiciary Committee’s consideration of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act is a significant step towards ending the failed war on drugs and correcting some of the harms that it has caused,” said Charlotte Resing, Policy Analyst, ACLU. “The bill not only deschedules marijuana at the federal level, but it also provides a roadmap for states to legalize in a just and equitable manner. The MORE Act also provides resentencing and expungement for those with marijuana convictions and mandates the inclusion of those most impacted by the criminalization of marijuana in the newly legal marijuana industry. The ACLU is pleased to support the MORE Act and its efforts to counter the over-criminalization, over policing, and mass incarceration stemming from the war on drugs.”

“The passage of the MORE Act represents the first time that the Judiciary Committee has ever had a successful vote to end the cruel policy of marijuana criminalization,” said NORML Political Director Justin Strekal. “Not only does the bill reverse the failed prohibition of cannabis, but it provides pathways for opportunity and ownership in the emerging industry for those who have suffered most. In 2018 alone, over 663,000 Americans were arrested for marijuana related crimes, a three-year high. Now that Chairman Nadler has moved the MORE Act through committee, it is time for the full House to vote and have every member of Congress show their constituents which side of history they stand on.”

The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act:

  • Decriminalizes marijuana at the federal level by removing the substance from the Controlled Substances Act. This applies retroactively to prior and pending convictions, and enables states to set their own policy.
  • Requires federal courts to expunge prior convictions, allows prior offenders to request expungement, and requires courts, on motion, to conduct re-sentencing hearings for those still under supervision.
  • Authorizes the assessment of a 5% sales tax on marijuana and marijuana products to create an Opportunity Trust Fund, which includes three grant programs:
    • The Community Reinvestment Grant Program: Provides services to the individuals most adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, including job training, re-entry services, legal aid, literacy programs, youth recreation, mentoring, and substance use treatment.
    • The Cannabis Opportunity Grant Program: Provides funds for loans to assist small businesses in the marijuana industry that are owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals.
    • The Equitable Licensing Grant Program: Provides funds for programs that minimize barriers to marijuana licensing and employment for the individuals most adversely impacted by the War on Drugs.
  • Opens up Small Business Administration funding for legitimate cannabis-related businesses and service providers.
  • Provides non-discrimination protections for marijuana use or possession, and for prior convictions for a marijuana offense:
    • Prohibits the denial of any federal public benefit (including housing) based on the use or possession of marijuana, or prior conviction for a marijuana offense.
    • Provides that the use or possession of marijuana, or prior conviction for a marijuana offense, will have no adverse impact under the immigration laws.
  • Requires the Bureau of Labor Statistics to collect data on the demographics of the industry to ensure people of color and those who are economically disadvantaged are participating in the industry.

###

SOURCE

S. 2227: MORE Act of 2019

LINK TO DOWNLOAD PDF


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dpa: “ In an unprecedented move, the House Judiciary Committee will vote on the MORE Act this Wednesday.”

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more act

Above:  Link to Press Conference

IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUEST!!!

From Drug Policy Alliance,

I want to make sure you didn’t miss the huge news in my email below. Tomorrow will go down in history as the closest we’ve come to ending federal marijuana prohibition and repairing the harms it’s causing to our communities.

The House Judiciary Committee will vote on the MORE Actthe first time ever a marijuana legalization bill has advanced this far federally. Please take action to help us make history and move the MORE Act onto the House floor.

PLEASE SEND A MESSAGE TO YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS!

DPA and supporters like you have spearheaded this groundbreaking bill from the beginning. This morning, our Executive Director Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno spoke with sponsors Rep. Jerry Nadler and Rep. Barbara Lee at a press conference about this pivotal moment.

Marijuana prohibition is harming us all, falling especially heavily on Black and Brown people. But together, we’re moving the MORE Act forward to end the federal war on marijuana and right the wrongs of prohibition.

Tune in with me and watch this crucial vote here. I’ll be in touch tomorrow and am hopeful we’ll make history!

SOURCE:

Drug Policy Alliance
131 West 33rd St., 15th Floor New York, NY 10001

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/BILLS-116s2227is/pdf/BILLS-116s2227is.pdf

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/116/s2227/text

http://www.drugpolicy.org/


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"…There is NO SUCH THING as a "Good" Pot Law, and that INCLUDES so called "Legalization"…."

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daffy duck

11/19/2019

6 States Trying to Legalize Recreational Marijuana in 2020

The opinion given here, is a response in comment to the article linked above, and the explanation thereof, are directed to inform everyone of just what “legalization” does…It lies to you!  Total REPEAL of these unlawful Statutes much be ensued to regain our Freedom upon this planet.  It’s not just Cannabis that they are afterIt is total control of everything…They just started with the “Marijuana”!

smkrider

Chris Ryan

I am totally convinced that the “National Organization for the Retention of Marijuana Legislation” (NORML) has been directed and driven by DEA COINTELPRO Money all along. It is the clearest explanation for why they keep insisting on keeping pot laws alive by demanding “regulations”.

Also, most of the corporate pro regulation types are also heavily invested in alcohol or tobacco or big pharma. As a result they try to somehow equate alcohol and tobacco with pot. But this is flawed because pot never killed anyone but alcohol and tobacco have both killed a lot of people.

“…There is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that INCLUDES so called “Legalization”….”

Just wait for a couple of years after you have passed your new pot laws, and the statehouse has had a chance to alter and amend and water down your law, and THEN we will see if you still like all the unseen and unpredictable changes that you did not predict or calculate. Then we will see if you STILL think it is a good idea or if you will realize, (As I did ages ago) that there is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that you wasted your time with all those signatures and all that lobbying and advertising.

There are many good ideas out there, and almost all of them are overshadowed by other bad ideas. Things like the idea that pot should be treated like alcohol for example. (In over 20,000 years if known human usage of cannabis there has yet to be a single case of toxic overdose from cannabis. Yet people drink themselves to death routinely. On that basis alone it is clear that pot should NOT be regulated “Like Alcohol”.) I tell you, putting your time money and effort into writing a law to make cannabis use “Legal” is NOT as useful and productive as simply removing the law itself so that there are no prohibitions. Abolish the pot law instead of re-write it.

I think that what you are proposing is just a form of legalized dealing for the rich that unfairly excludes the little guy and seeks to use the law to create a lever against smallholders and persons of color while granting enormous special privileges for the wealthy. Every state I have seen that tries to “Legalize” pot does so by starting with a “Licensing” deal where the entry fee for a license is about a million dollars. And in every one of those states the state bends over backwards to grant concessions to corporations seeking to sell and market pot while using tax money from those corporations to crack down on anybody who does NOT have a license. It is like “Legalization for the wealthy”.

And in SOME states, (Like Colorado for example.) the money brought in by cannabis taxes is used to double down on busting persons of color who are deemed “Illegal”. I say that all this is just playing with numbers and rules and that it is just more bullshit. A sort of “kinder gentler” form of keeping pot basically illegal while granting a special privilege to those with money. And I honestly DO NOT REALLY CARE about the guy who gets busted with a “Small Amount” because I already know that small amount came from someone who has a large amount.

After spending my entire life as an adult in the “Pot Underground”, and being the biggest pot dealer in Ohio before I got busted, I am honestly prejudiced in favor of the small to middling sized pot dealer who is the vital middle link in the pot supply chain. Legalization as it affects that guy is going to really determine what ultimately happens to pot in this country.

If you build a legalization that cuts that guy out, or gives their role to someone who do not have the same knowledge and experience that the mid-level dealers provide, you will end up with a market that is designed to cater to the wealthy the privileged and the few. As a direct result, I will tell you that merely working to “re-write” the pot laws as opposed to abolishing and eliminating them, will hurt your end result. ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW.

I have BEEN the fucking “Black Market” for longer than you have been alive. You can take your studies at Oaksterdam and stick them up your ass. Your proposals do NOT create a level playing field, and they amount to legalization for the rich, which is a far cry from everybody can do what they want. When you rail against the black market you are saying that you are just wanting to have the money and lifestyle of a pot dealer without the responsibility or the risk. But at the same time you fail to recognize that the stash in your pocket is there BECAUSE of that very same black market you claim to despise.

I say to you that the black market is the ONLY market, and that unless you recognize how the entire pot distribution network actually works you are just pissing in the wind and creating legalization for the rich.

 I speak from experience. I have spent my entire life in the Pot Underground, including about 10 years where I was simply put, the biggest pot dealer in Ohio. (That all ended when I got busted in ’09.) Nowadays I spend a lot of my time using my experience to talk about the real day to day realities of those in the Pot Underground and they ways that so called “Legalization” will actually HURT pot distribution schemes unless you are in the top 1%. You have not had the time, or been in the position to have had the sorts of experiences I have had, nor to gain the knowledge that I have achieved, and are just spouting off without knowing what you are talking about. You speculate endlessly about how things SHOULD be but you don’t really have the time or experience to really know. And I will close with this simple adage. “…There is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that INCLUDES your so called “Legalization”…” ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW!

All you are doing is trying to corporatize pot. And the only way that can happen is by using laws and regulations to do so. And all of those government laws and regulations are completely unnecessary.

Between the American Civil War and the Great Depression there was NO FEDERAL POT LAW WHATSOEVER. And there was no national crisis regarding or involving pot at that time either. So the claim that pot laws are needed and necessary are provably false.


https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PrY7nFbwAY&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3C5OMnPZC9KuN1ukjtrIrefgu8GJ0gY4bD6BBv1MvR5h6l2WFOpg92I8s

https://www.facebook.com/chris.ryan.1232760

https://www.facebook.com/groups/USMjParty/permalink/10158252526518521/


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This Is The Way It Works…

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11/19/2019  By:  Cris Ericson

cris ericson 10.3.18

Let’s say for example, you win the lottery and spend a lot of money making television ads to promote your campaign as a candidate for the November 3, 2020 Election for U.S. Congress, and you don’t say much, just the usual “Hope” and “Change” and words that people fall for, and because you are dressed nicely and speak softly with a very slight sex appeal, you get elected.

Maybe you hire a professional voice dub-over, a person to speak in the commercials, and people think its your voice, but its not (did you notice Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez had the sexiest softest voice in the world in her radio commercials, and then she won the election and in real life she sounds like a hag with a sore throat?).

Well, O.K., so let’s imagine you win. Now what?

You go to Washington, D.C. and you are going to make marijuana LAWFUL and you are going to repeal every single stinking no good for nothing marijuana law. You are going to propose an Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, like ending alcoholic beverage prohibition, back when alcoholic beverages were actually illegal in the United States.

But then something terrible happens!

Speaker of the House, Nanny Pelosi, informs you that SHE is the Speaker of the House and SHE will assign YOU to whichever Committee SHE wants to assign you to.

Huh?

Where is the freedom of association guaranteed by the US Constitution? Why can’t you join any committee you want to join – like agriculture! Yeah, that’s the ticket – the Agriculture Committee! Make all plants legal!

Oh, but no, no, no, no, no, no! Speaker of the House, Nanny Pelosi will screech and scream at YOU if you DARE expect to join any committee you want to!

Then, guess what?

You might think you can go visit any committee hearing room you want to, but this is not so!  You would be kicked out on your ass!  The uppity close friends of Nanny Pelosi like to have THEIR hearing rooms in secret!

Why?

Why don’t you get any freedom of speech and freedom of association so you can do what you need to do to make marijuana LAWFUL?

Ah ha!

FOR EXAMPLE, if you are on a medical type committee, then the in-crowd in that committee room writes up a Bill to give the N.I.H., National Institute of Health, billions of tax dollars which the N.I.H. gives to researchers who patent their inventions of pharmaceutical drugs, and then they start their own new pharmaceutical corporations and then they give the members of the Congressional Committee “kick-backs” of political campaign contributions and their Lobbyists wine and dine them and give them very special favors.

Huh?

Isn’t that some kind of combination of bribery and money laundering and witch craft? Yeah, but no one complains because the committee hearings are in secret, and you can’t get in because Speaker of the House Nanny Pelosi has the lock and key to every room.

And so it goes, the U.S. Congress is the number one crime gang in the entire world. Guns, pharmaceutical drugs, weapons, bombs for sale to our “allies”! 

Yep, everything is all for sale with a nice kick-back to the very specially selected members of US Congress, who Nanny Pelosi picks to be in certain committee rooms, and then she gets HER kick-back, you better believe it! And YOU get assigned, by Nanny Pelosi, to the toilet paper committee!

So, WHAT DO WE DO ABOUT THIS? HOW DO WE CHANGE THE BULLSHIT GOING ON IN WASHINGTON, D.C. SO WE CAN MAKE MARIJUANA TRULY LAWFUL?  AND, restore our God-given Human Rights as well?

We must promote the alarming and shocking new idea that members of the US Congress should have equal rights.  The same as each other.  If they don’t have equal rights the same as each other, then the people in the States that they represent do NOT have equal representation! We must DEMAND that all of our elected US Senators and US Congressmen and US Congresswomen and US Congress, LGBT and US Congress-sexless people have EQUAL RIGHTS TO FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION TO JOIN ANY COMMITTEE THEY WANT TO JOIN, AND TO ENTER ANY HEARING ROOM THEY WANT TO ENTER, AND FREEDOM OF SPEECH TO HAVE AN EQUAL TURN TO TALK ABOUT A SUBJECT.

THAT’S THE BOTTOM LINE.


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The shocking story behind Richard Nixon’s ‘War on Drugs’ that targeted blacks and anti-war activists

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Scholar @Mark_J_Perry   June 14, 2018

This Sunday, June 17 will mark the 47th anniversary of a shameful day in US history — it’s when President Richard Nixon’s declared what has been the US government’s longest and costliest war — the epic failure known as the War on Drugs. At a press conference on that day in 1971, Nixon identified drug abuse as “public enemy number one in the United States” and launched a failed, costly and inhumane federal war on Americans that continues to today. Early the following year, Nixon created the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement (ODALE) in January 1972 to wage a government war on otherwise peaceful and innocent Americans who voluntarily chose to ingest plants, weeds, and intoxicants proscribed by the government. In July 1973, ODALE was consolidated, along with several other federal drug agencies, into the newly established Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a new “super agency” to handle all aspects of the War on Drugs Otherwise Peaceful Americans.

But as John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s counsel and Assistant for Domestic Affairs, revealed in 1994, the real public enemy in 1971 wasn’t really drugs or drug abuse. Rather the real enemies of the Nixon administration were the anti-war left and blacks, and the War on Drugs was designed as an evil, deceptive and sinister policy to wage a war on those two groups. In an article in the April 2016 issue of The Atlantic (“Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs“) author and reporter Dan Baum explains how “John Ehrlichman, the Watergate co-conspirator, unlocked for me one of the great mysteries of modern American history: How did the United States entangle itself in a policy of drug prohibition that has yielded so much misery and so few good results?” As Baum discovered, here’s the dirty and disgusting secret to that great mystery of what must be the most expensive, shameful, and reprehensible failed government policy in US history.

Americans have been criminalizing psychoactive substances since San Francisco’s anti-opium law of 1875, but it was Ehrlichman’s boss, Richard Nixon, who declared the first “War on Drugs” in 1971 and set the country on the wildly punitive and counterproductive path it still pursues. I’d tracked Ehrlichman, who had been Nixon’s domestic-policy adviser, to an engineering firm in Atlanta, where he was working on minority recruitment. At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away.

“You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

Nixon’s invention of the War on Drugs as a political tool was cynical, but every president since — Democrat and Republican alike — has found it equally useful for one reason or another. Meanwhile, the growing cost of the Drug War is now impossible to ignore: billions of dollars wasted, bloodshed in Latin America and on the streets of our own cities, and millions of lives destroyed by draconian punishment that doesn’t end at the prison gate; one of every eight black men has been disenfranchised because of a felony conviction.

MP: As much as Prohibition (The War on Alcohol) was also an expensive, epic and misguided failure of government policy, it didn’t have its origins in any type of equivalent sinister and evil plot like the War on Drugs to destroy enemies of the Woodrow Wilson administration in 1919. In fact, President Wilson vetoed the Volstead Act, the popular name for the National Prohibition Act, but the House and Senate both voted quickly to override the veto and America started the War on Alchohol Otherwise Peaceful Americans Who Voluntarily Chose to Ingest Beer, Wine, and Spirits in 1920.

If the real goal of the War on Drugs was to target, convict and incarcerate subversive anti-war “hippies” and black Americans, as Ehrlichman describes it, it sure worked as the chart above of the male incarceration rate in the US shows. During the nearly 50-year period between 1925 and the early 1970s, the male incarceration rate was remarkably stable at about 200 men per 100,000 population, or 1 US male per 500, according to data from Bureau of Justice Statistics. By 1986, about a decade after the War on Drugs started locking up drug users and dealers in cages, the male incarceration rate doubled to 400 per 100,000 population. Then within another decade, the male incarceration rate doubled again to more than 800 by 1996 before reaching a historic peak of 956 in 2008 (about one in 100) that was almost five times higher than the stable rate before the War on Drugs. The arrest and incarceration data show that the War on Drugs had a significantly much greater negative effect on blacks and Hispanics than whites, making the Drug War even more shameful for its devastating and disproportionate adverse effects on America’s most vulnerable and disadvantaged populations.

Since the 2008 peak, the male incarceration rate has been gradually declining in each of the last seven years of available data through 2016, possibly because of three trends: a) decriminalization of weeds at the city and state level, b) the legalization of medical weeds at the state level, and c) now legalization of recreational weeds at the city and state levels.

While there could have been other factors that contributed to the nearly five-fold increase in the male incarceration rate between the early 1970s and the peak in 2008, research clearly shows that the War on Drugs, along with mandatory minimum sentencing in the 1980s and the disparate treatment of powdered cocaine and “crack cocaine” (powdered cocaine processed with baking soda into smokable rocks) were all significant contributing factors to the unprecedented rate of incarcerating Americans. Here are some conclusions from the 2014 book The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences (my emphasis):

  1. The states’ combined incarceration rates increased across all crime categories between 1980 and 2010 (see chart above). Most striking, however, is the dramatic increase in the incarceration rate for drug-related crimes. In 1980, imprisonment for drug offenses was rare, with a combined state incarceration rate of 15 per 100,000 population. By 2010, the drug incarceration rate had increased nearly 10-fold to 143 per 100,000. Indeed, the rate of incarceration for the single category of drug-related offenses, excluding local jails and federal prisons, by itself exceeds by 50% the average incarceration rate for all crimes of Western European countries and is twice the average incarceration rate for all crimes of a significant number of European countries.
  2. Arrest rates for federal drug offenses climbed in the 1970s, and mandatory prison time for these offenses became more common in the 1980s. Mandatory prison sentences, intensified enforcement of drug laws, and long sentences contributed not only to overall high rates of incarceration but also especially to extraordinary rates of incarceration in black and Latino communities. Intensified enforcement of drug laws subjected blacks, more than whites, to new mandatory minimum sentences—despite lower levels of drug use and no higher demonstrated levels of trafficking among the black than the white population.
  3. As a result of the lengthening of sentences and greatly expanded drug law enforcement and imprisonment for drug offenses, criminal defendants became more likely to be sentenced to prison and remained there significantly longer than in the past. The policy shifts that propelled the growth in incarceration had disproportionately large effects on African Americans and Latinos. Indeed, serving time in prison has become a normal life event among recent birth cohorts of African American men who have not completed high school.

Bottom Line: Even without the nefarious, vile, and veiled origins revealed by Ehrlichman in 1994, the War on Drugs Otherwise Peaceful Americans Who Voluntarily Choose To Ingest or Sell Intoxicants Currently Proscribed by the Government, Which Will Lock Up Users or Sellers in Cages if Caught would represent one of the most shameful chapters in America’s history. But with its intention to destroy the black community and anti-war peace activists, which has certainly been “successfully” achieved for the black community, the shamefulness of the War on Drugs is elevated to a much higher level of despicable, evil immorality.

Mark J. Perry

Mark J. Perry

Scholar

CONTINUE READING…


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Arrangements Being Made for TKP Thorne Peters

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tkp cemetery

Arrangements for burial are in the process of being made at Elmwood Cemetery located at;

824 S. Dudley Street
Memphis, Tennessee 38104

LINK above…

So far, costs are at approximately $ 5,795.00, which includes;

$ 2,995.00 Cemetery Costs; $ 1,200.00 Open/Close, $ 1,500.00 Preparation Fees. 

DONATIONS are desperately needed!  You can donate thru the link above by contacting the Cemetery, or thru the “Freedom Fund” on ThornePeters.com.

Further information will be made available as it is planned.

Please help our “Freedom Fighter” to be laid to rest in a most appropriate place!

Additionally, Ms. Linda Harrah will need help with legal fee’s, etc.,

Any small amount is most appreciated!

Thank You!

tkp 1

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2583959581684371/UzpfSTEwMDAwMDA1MjI4MDUxNDpWSzo3Njc0NzE0MzcwMTI0OTc/

http://www.elmwoodcemetery.org/

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2585574071522922/?__tn__=%2CdlC-R&eid=ARCZFIvKjmvA8BboKF6oPqNNENXHVuPqGJHNVj6X__6xYIwmuFdBO7N-9v45asuelZ376UniyUfgr0RE&hc_ref=ARTfvDLn31JUqYbrBEsjzP9gddGabcIAB90-upzvriC7RCUyk5SXycn4S0ISwBYol1Q


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