On Tuesday, November 5th, WE Must Be The Change In Kentucky! Vote HICKS/CORMICAN! This Is Why…

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On Tuesday, November 5th, the most important election in Kentucky in many years is about to happen!

I am not here to argue with anyone.  I am here to present the facts and my opinion as I see it.

Therefore,

First of all, you must vote to see change!  If you are eligible to Vote and are registered to do so – You must VOTE!  It is your Civic Duty.  And if you are eligible to vote but did not register, shame on you!

IF you want a change in your Government, you have to vote for the people who will CHANGE the way things are being done in           Kentucky!

You CANNOT vote for a Democrat or Republican and expect anything to change – only to get worse!  So if that is what you want, then go for it!

Otherwise, BE THE CHANGE that Kentucky must have in order to succeed!  John Hicks and Ann Cormican – Libertarian are running for the most important office in the State.  That is where we must start!  At the top!

On November 1st, Rep. Jason Nemes prefiled this years “medical marijuana bill” for Kentucky.  It will become House Bill 136 when the Session opens in January, and if it passes we will once again become Slaves to the system!  A few points on the Bill as written are:

*  Department for Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control to implement and regulate the medicinal marijuana program in Kentucky;

*  establish the Division of Medicinal Marijuana within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control;

establish restrictions on the possession of medicinal marijuana by qualifying patients, visiting patients, and designated caregivers;

*  establish certain protections for cardholders;

*  establish professional protections for practitioners; to provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal marijuana;

*  establish professional protections for attorneys;

* prohibit the possession and use of medicinal marijuana while operating a motor vehicle;

to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;

* to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;

*  to require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; to establish requirements for registry identification cards; to establish registry identification card fees; to require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system; to establish the application requirements for a registry identification card; to establish when the department may deny an application for a registry identification card;

*  establish certain responsibilities for cardholders; to establish when a registry identification card may be revoked;

*  establish various cannabis business licensure categories; to establish tiering of cannabis business licenses; to require certain information be included in an application for a cannabis business license; to establish when the department may deny an application for a cannabis business license;

*  to establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives;

*  establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses;

to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state;

*  to establish requirements for cannabis cultivators, including cultivation square footage limits; to establish requirements for cannabis dispensaries; to establish requirements for safety compliance facilities; to establish requirements for cannabis processors; to establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses;

to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;

*  to establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; to establish the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to establish the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; and to establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys;

*  create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax of 12% for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries; to require that 80% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to require that 20% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law;

Is this what you want?

The above is not all inclusive of the regulations, and they will no doubt change again when it is introduced in January.  Read the Bill!

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Please note that there are NO provisions for “smokable cannabis”, and NO mention of Children’s rights either.  There are NO provisions for growing your own plants, and this BILL in my opinion is being promoted for the Corporate/Pharmaceutical industry. 

Out of all the Bills previously submitted for “medical” or “adult use” Cannabis in Kentucky this is the worst one yet!  Do not fall for the legal lies which they are feeding you because they are preying on your fears for your Children’s needs, mostly.  The fact is, what M.D., is going to give you permission or a written statement that will give you the right to medicate your child with Cannabis?  The answer to that is virtually none, and if there was even one that WOULD do it there is no guarantee that you will be able to access that Physician!

The bill would prohibit the smoking of marijuana for medical purposes, but would allow other forms of consumption, such as edibles, oils and pills.  A 12% excise tax is proposed for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries.  LINK

I have consulted with several other Senior Activists in Kentucky over this issue and we all surmised basically the same opinions on the matter!  This is in NO way a repeal of prohibition of Cannabis and in no way will it ascertain our rights to this plant – medically or otherwise.  It is however, worth some $$$ to Corporate Ventures and Kentucky Government as it now stands!

In my opinion, for those parents who have seriously ill children in need of this medicine they need to consider moving to a honest medical cannabis State such as Colorado or elsewhere.  For those who are unable to do this due to financial situations we must set up a fund to enable them to do so.  I can honestly say that if it were my child that is exactly what I would do!  Not because I want to leave my home in Kentucky, but because my Childs life is more important and I would be compelled to do so, IF John Hicks and Ann Cormican are not elected. 

The “Undergreen Railroad” is one such organization.  I will look into this organization further, especially if Hicks/Cormican are not elected, because you all are going to need it!

Finally, we come to the third candidate in the governor’s race. Libertarian John Hicks. John is a Vietnam Era Army veteran, a former school teacher, and currently an IT consultant. He has a BA Degree in Political Science and History. He has never held political office, but ran previously for State Representative (District 43) in 2018. John is pro-life and believes government should stay out of personal issues.
John supports the legalization of marijuana, expanded gaming, and the development of hemp as sources of additional state revenue (better than raising taxes!). He also believes that the best way to compensate for budget shortfalls is to reduce the size of government and streamlining operations. Additionally, John Hicks supports election reform; specifically by introducing run-offs, using ranked choice voting, proportional representation, multi member districts which would end partisan gerrymandering.
   LINK

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Manages Kentucky Open Source Society

John Hicks IS qualified for the position of Governor, as he IS ONE OF US!  He will bring us liberty and fight for OUR rights as Kentucky Citizens!

We need to show the entire Country what Kentucky can do when faced with such a dire situation – It’s not just about Cannabis – It is about Liberty and  Justice for All!

Please make the right choice for our State, our Families, our Children, and our Country!

Do not condemn Our State once again!

God Bless You All

smkrider

11/3/2019

https://www.facebook.com/HicksForKentucky/

https://www.facebook.com/hicksforkygov/

https://www.facebook.com/jason.nemes.1/posts/3321913687848659

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3321910424515652&set=a.170767459629980&type=3&theater

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=33

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/prefiled/BR366.html?fbclid=IwAR1A_cH3LEwMDixbcMN1o5u5XrRB-gFQZM4qmAaZXrIZa9aYUjEjmeA4vgE

https://www.facebook.com/johnrhicks?__tn__=%2Cd-]-h-R&eid=ARANzRCvypZKWWjzlKWQixSeBkF7a97sNZINNMIU-dY8JZZgHxFfuPbr1urQ6ro5Ui9nfNGocWfFP88Z

http://www.anotheropinionblog.com/2019/11/the-2019-kentucky-election-main-event.html?fbclid=IwAR2vzCm-4QDieeyVDP2XKDUtgvSHkcivekuOVKzOCd2JiYaFJEGca1AFr7o

https://www.wlky.com/article/kentucky-lawmaker-prefiles-bill-to-legalize-medical-marijuana/29669383?fbclid=IwAR2a8kMPicpnBgioaeKcHaEoYxiuBNGC3bzvwhGsb10DS7DoVeHIMu3wBD0#

http://www.ladybud.com/2014/01/14/the-undergreen-railroad-helping-patients-relocate-for-cannabis-access/

Peruvian President Ollanta Humala suspended U.S.-backed plans to begin eradication there and replaced the Peruvian drug czar who was advocating it

LIMA, Peru — Colombia surpassed Peru last year in land under coca cultivation, with Peru experiencing a 14 per cent drop in acreage for the plant used to make cocaine, according to UN data released Wednesday.

The UN Office on Drugs and Crime’s annual report on Peruvian coca’s crop said it encompassed 42,900 hectares. It’s the crop’s fourth straight year of decline and the smallest area under cultivation since 1998.

The finding does not necessarily mean Colombia is now the world’s No. 1 cocaine producer, however. Much of Peru’s crop is more mature and higher yielding, having never been subjected to eradication.

Peru’s government does not destroy coca in the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro river valley, the world’s leading coca-growing region, citing security concerns. The size of Belgium and Israel

combined, the valley accounts for 68 per cent of Peru’s coca crop.

Last year, Peruvian President Ollanta Humala suspended U.S.-backed plans to begin eradication there and replaced the Peruvian drug czar who was advocating it.

The U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy estimates Peru’s potential cocaine production for 2014 at 285 metric tons, versus 245 metric tons for Colombia.

Peru’s drug czar, Alberto Otarola, said his government is not finished measuring potential cocaine production but estimated it at currently “no more than 270 tons.”

Two weeks ago, the UN said Colombia’s coca acreage skyrocketed in 2014 from 48,000 hectares to 69,000 hectares. That’s in large part because of reduced aerial spraying. The herbicide used, glyphosate, was recently classified by a UN health agency as a probable carcinogen.

Peru only eradicates manually.

“We are the Andean region country that has advanced most in reducing coca leaf,” Otarola told reporters. Peru destroyed 31,000 hectares of coca last year and has set the goal of destroying 35,000 hectares this year.

The policy provokes resistance from the tens of thousands of Peruvians who depend on coca for their livelihood.

On Tuesday, at least one person was killed and 25 people, including seven police officers, were injured in a clash between coca farmers and police in the Amazonian town of Constitution, local officials said. The farmers were protesting eradication and a lack of alternative development in the region.

One indicator of cocaine production is the amount of coca leaf harvested per country.

In 2014, Peru produced an estimated 100,800 metric tons, compared to 132,700 metric tons for Colombia, said Flavio Mirella, the Peru country representative for the UN agency.

The vast majority of coca leaf grown in both countries is used to produce cocaine.

The UN and the U.S. both agree that Bolivia is the No. 3 cocaine-producing nation after Colombia and Peru. The White House put Bolivia’s estimated potential cocaine production at 210 metric tons, up from 145 metric tons in 2012.

Bolivia has become a major transit and refining country for Peruvian cocaine in recent years.

The U.S. ended counter-narcotics assistance to Bolivia in 2013, five years after its government expelled the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

CONTINUE READING…

Southern Oregon medical marijuana growers fear industrial hemp could ruin their crops

 

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Southern Oregon marijuana growers want to ban industrial hemp production from the region out of fear that hemp may pollinate their crops and render them worthless.

Some outdoor marijuana growers want industrial hemp cultivation to be limited to eastern Oregon – far from their lucrative marijuana crops. At the very least, they don’t want hemp in Josephine, Jackson and Douglas counties.

Compared to Oregon’s marijuana legalization movement, the effort to launch an industrial hemp industry in Oregon has been an understated one propelled by a small but passionate group of advocates. When one of them, Edgar Winters, of Eagle Point, got a permit this month to grow industrial hemp on 25 acres in the heart of the state’s outdoor marijuana growing region, his neighbors were alarmed.

Allowing industrial hemp in an area known for churning out high-grade marijuana could undermine the industry, growers argue.

"You don’t come into the middle of cannabis growing country and try to put up a hemp farm unless you don’t know about it, unless you really don’t know how far hemp pollen can travel," said Casey Branham, a Jackson County medical marijuana grower who supports industrial hemp but wants it grown elsewhere in the state.

"It basically makes the medicine worthless," he said.

Branham and his neighbors worry hemp pollen will find its way to their unpollinated female cannabis flowers, known as sensimilla, slowing their growth and leading to seeds. The result: weak, seedy marijuana.

"No one will buy seeded flowers, period," said Cedar Grey, a Williams medical marijuana grower. "The flower market is so competitive these days. You have to have world-class flowers. Anything that is seeded is reminiscent of the 1960s or pot from Mexico. No one is interested in that at all."

And it’s not just southern Oregon’s outdoor marijuana growers who are worried about hemp’s implications. Portland’s indoor marijuana growers worry about hemp pollen drifting into their warehouses through ventilation systems or being tracked into their operations on workers’ shoes.

Shane McKee, a medical marijuana grower who owns two Portland dispensaries, said the potential complications posed by industrial hemp have caught cannabis growers by surprise.

"Nobody really saw the repercussions," said McKee.

Hemp and marijuana are different types of the same species, Cannabis sativa. But hemp lacks marijuana’s most coveted component: THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol. In hemp’s case, the gene that fires up marijuana’s high THC production is essentially turned off. So while hemp’s sturdy stalks provide fiber for textiles and its seeds can be added to yogurt and smoothies, the plant is a lousy choice for people seeking marijuana’s high.

Anndrea Hermann, a hemp advocate who lives in Canada and teaches a course on the crop at Oregon State University, said marijuana growers’ concerns are legitimate.

"Is there a risk? Yes, there is a risk to the marijuana growers," said Hermann, who also serves as president of the Hemp Industries Association and owns a hemp products company. "And I will tell you it’s a hard pill to swallow."

Winters is the first to obtain a license to grow industrial hemp from the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Another three people have applied, said Ron Pence, operations manager for commodity inspection for the agency, which oversees the state’s new industrial hemp program.

Pence said the agency has authority to limit where some agricultural crops, such as rapeseed, are cultivated. But it does not have that authority when it comes to industrial hemp.

"It would need a legislative fix," he said.

Oregon lawmakers have taken note of marijuana growers’ objections. Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, said growers peppered his office with emails once Winters’ plans became public. He said lawmakers are exploring potential solutions to protect both crops.

"Nobody wants one crop to endanger another crop," he said.

Oregon’s robust outdoor marijuana growing culture sets it apart from places like Kentucky, which also has a state hemp program. Oregon’s outdoor growers are organized, have an attorney and even a lobbyist. While Kentucky’s agriculture officials are enthusiastic boosters of industrial hemp, marijuana remains illegal.

"Marijuana growers are not so vocal" in Kentucky, said Eric Steenstra, president of Vote Hemp, a national hemp advocacy group. "They are not in a position to be able to call up their legislators to ask for a bill protecting their crops."

Winters, for his part, doesn’t see a major problem cultivating hemp near marijuana crops. He said the growing cycle for hemp is shorter than the one for outdoor marijuana and that an earlier harvest means it would not pose a threat to cannabis.

"It’s been doable all over the world," said Winters, who’s also a medical marijuana grower. "People have misconceptions about industrial hemp."

He said marijuana growers need more "education and training and knowledge" about hemp and that he plans to meet with outdoor growers to address their concerns.

He said he’s received strong criticism from marijuana growers and even personal threats since word of his plan spread.

"It’s a viable crop," he said. "There is no way we are going to be forced out of the county. I can tell you that. We are here to stay."

— Noelle Crombie

CONTINUE READING…

We have to just say NO, to “drug testing”…

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While sitting here thinking of my friends in pain who are trapped into slavery thru the Corporations they work for via “workplace drug testing”…who are condemned to use ONLY narcotics via the pharmaceutical industrial complex via so called “pain clinic’s” and doctors who are trapped in the prescribing business AND the drug screening business, which is equal to drug trafficking via legal means, 

I am wondering why,

just why not say NO!

*The Feds cannot force you to take a drug test for employmentThey can and do force drug testing upon “pain patients” and parolees which is another issue of it’s own.

This is done by the Corporations themselves.  Insurance Companies are involved  as well of course the Corporations who make the “testing kits” and at the same time they are making “pass your drug test kits” which people run out and buy in order to succumb to the Industrial and Insurance related Complex.

WE HAVE TO JUST SAY NO…

Our Father’s and Grandfather’s went to war and lost their lives for our freedom by the thousands, and I could start a whole new issue on that subject alone, but I will save that for another day.

 

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GATEWOOD GALBRAITH SPEECH

 

The question here is are we willing to consume less to have more freedom?

We can effectively turn the prohibition around and “prohibit” them from invading our privacy, and entering our property without a search warrant, (symbolically), just by refusing or saying NO to their test.

I have never passed a drug test for Cannabis/Marijuana.

I also have never failed one for any other non-prescribed drug.

Do not worry about passing your next drug test.

DO start looking for other ways and means of making an income such as working for small privately owned companies which are few and far between but do still exist.  You can also sub-contract yourself, or work independently.

If you are lucky enough that you have already obtained a job and passed your drug test then just hope like hell you don’t get picked on too soon.

If you have not found a job yet, then DO NOT work for a company which is telling you that you must succumb to “random drug testing” or “pre-employment drug testing”.

This could effectively be a type of “civil disobedience” which is actually legal to do.  Again, “just say no” to drug testing.

If EVERYONE followed this one rule, it would not take long for  “drug testing” to disappear much like the “inspection stickers” for vehicles in the 1980’s did in Kentucky when everyone was so poor they could not afford to make their vehicles pass the test.  Eventually  they gave up and ended it.  (Just imagine what would happen if all these people could not pay their electric bill for one month.  It is true that you would not have electric for that period of time but it is also true that the electric company would not be getting near as much income for that period of time).  Most people CAN survive without electric for a month.  That has been proven by the people themselves who have suffered loss due to storms, etc.,

If you are unemployable you have a reason to file for disability.  Not that you will be approved, but just think of the paperwork put upon the SSA if everyone that failed a drug test filed for disability.  And then when they do not approve it, appeal the decision.  You can keep them “dancing” for a while – just depends upon how far you want to take it.

If they DO NOT end the drug testing at that point it could cause even more black market businesses to appear just for the fact that they can’t fill the Industrial Complex with legal worker’s.

The Industrial Complex cannot afford to loose it’s slaves so therefore I do not think it would take too long to accomplish the goal of ending “drug testing” policies.

And just like everything else the poorest of the people will be the one’s affected the most in this decision and have to suffer the “worse” before it gets better.

BECAUSE, they do not drug test politicians nor doctors or lawyers….

I guess it comes down to the sad fact whether or not you want to have freedom and live on beans and soup, or be a slave and eat commercial hamburgers.

I do not want to suggest that everyone absent mindedly quit their jobs tomorrow with no plans on how to sustain themselves.  However, making alternative plans for an income is always a good idea regardless.

 

sheree

This has been “something to think about” ,

Smkrider

 

*According to Henriksson, the anti-drug appeals of the Reagan administration “created an environment in which many employers felt compelled to implement drug testing programs because failure to do so might be perceived as condoning drug use. This fear was easily exploited by aggressive marketing and sales forces, who often overstated the value of testing and painted a bleak picture of the consequences of failing to use the drug testing product or service being offered.”[36] On March 10, 1986, the Commission on Organized Crime asked all U.S. companies to test employees for drug use. By 1987, nearly 25% of the Fortune 500 companies used drug tests.[37]

**THC and its major (inactive) metabolite, THC-COOH, can be measured in blood, urine, hair, oral fluid or sweat using chromatographic techniques as part of a drug use testing program or a forensic investigation of a traffic or other criminal offense.[91] The concentrations obtained from such analyses can often be helpful in distinguishing active use from passive exposure, elapsed time since use, and extent or duration of use.

***Drug testing in order for potential recipients to receive welfare has become an increasingly controversial topic

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Marijuana fed pork becoming highly sucessful

 

 

SEATTLE, Washington (KING) – It’s a different kind of head shop found just down the stairs from the Pike Place market.

It’s the BB Ranch selling something that’s even better than bacon. It’s marijuana fed pork.

“The pig farmer has been feeding them marijuana for the last two and a half months of their life and they’ve been happy as hell,” said William Von Schneidau, owner of the butcher shop.

This is all thanks the voters of Washington who legalized marijuana in the last election. That’s when Von Schneidau saw the opportunity wasn’t just blowing smoke.

“And then all of a sudden marijuana, you know, became legal a few months ago and somehow, I don’t know how, I met the commercial growers and they needed to get rid of some of their stuff. So rather than going into the compost pile we said, ‘Lets try it out.’ So here we go,” said he said.

The pigs are raised in a farm about an hour outside of Seattle. In fact, these pigs are on the rock star diet. The mix contains drugs and alcohol, the booze coming by way of the spent grains from Woodinville’s Project V Vodka.

The pot pigs grow to be extra fat and really happy according to the farmer who wants to be anonymous.

Here’s the tough part of the story. The pigs love eating weed, and what gives me pleasure is BBQ pork.

So I brought some pot pork belly to my buddy Steve Freeman at Celtic Cowboy BBQ in Edmonds. And we decided to smoke it.

Steve rubbed the belly, which is basically the part that bacon comes from, with spices and tossed it into the smoker for about 45 minuets. He then seared it on a skillet.

Steve says the results are stunning.

“That’s some pretty happy pork right there. He’s done a good job with that. I really like that,” he said.

And that takes us back to the happiest farm in Washington. Yes, the pigs will become BBQ one day.

But if you gotta go, why not go out on a high.

CONTINUE READING/VIDEO….

Caudill Seed becoming poster child for hemp legalization

Pat Caudill, left, is pictured with Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and Dan Caudill. The Caudill brothers are co-owners of Caudill Seed Co.






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Pat Caudill, left, is pictured with Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and Dan Caudill. The Caudill brothers are co-owners of Caudill Seed Co.

 
Kevin Eigelbach
Reporter- Business First
Email  | Follow Kevin on Twitter

Louisville-based Caudill Seed Co. is quickly becoming the poster child for the legalization of hemp production in Kentucky.

The company has been featured in a CBS News report, on WDRB-TV in Louisville and in several newspaper articles, with owners Dan Caudill and Pat Caudill explaining what they think a legal hemp crop would mean for Kentucky and their company.

The two became interested in the issue when they met James Comer, now Kentucky’s Secretary of Agriculture, during his 2011 campaign for the office. Legalizing hemp to give Kentucky farmers a new revenue stream is one of Comer’s priorities.

Because it has so many hills, Kentucky has a lot of land that’s only marginal for agriculture, Dan Caudill said in an interview. Hemp is an ideal crop for the state because it can grow nearly anywhere, just like tobacco.

Aside from farmers, the rest of the state would benefit if it could create hemp-processing facilities that would provide jobs, Caudill said. Hemp seeds can be processed into oil, and its tough fibers can be woven into fabrics to make clothes or entwined to make rope.

Every year, Caudill Seed imports from Brazil about 75 tractor/trailer loads of twine made from sisal that it distributes to farm retailers for bailing hay. The Caudill brothers would like to distribute rope made locally instead.

Chances of passage better than 50-50

The company expects to benefit from legalized hemp production in two ways, Dan Caudill said. It would be able to buy seed and sell it to farmers who want to grow hemp. And, it would process seed grown by Kentucky farmers and sell it to crushing companies that would extract the oil.

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The Latest Hemp news in Kentucky…

Kentucky state senator to bring hemp bill up for vote

  • By The Associated Press
  • Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:13 p.m.

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee sounded upbeat Monday about prospects for his bill that would regulate industrial hemp production in Kentucky if the federal government lifts its decades-long ban on the crop that once was a Bluegrass state staple.

Republican Sen. Paul Hornback of Shelbyville said Monday he intends to bring the hemp bill up for a vote in his committee, which is expected to review the legislation at a Feb. 11 hearing. Hemp proponent U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is scheduled to appear at the hearing and put his political weight behind the measure.

CONTINUE READING…

 

Don’t call it a ‘Weed;’ Momentum for hemp in Ky

by Joe Arnold

WHAS11.com

Posted on January 28, 2013 at 8:07 AM

Updated yesterday at 10:38 AM

FRANKFORT, Ky (WHAS11) — Reinvigorated after a ten year dormancy, Kentucky’s Industrial Hemp Commission meets Monday morning with an apparent new momentum.
The effort recently gained the endorsement of the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and bills that would legalize the crop are expected to be debated when the General Assembly’s "short session" resumes in February. 
Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville), a sponsor of one of the bills (SB50) and a statutory member of the commission, is scheduled to attend.

CONTINUE READING…

 

Kentucky Narcotic Officer’s Association: No to Legalizing Hemp

By Kevin Willis

The recent talk in Frankfort about legalizing industrial hemp hasn’t convinced the head of the Kentucky Narcotic Officer’s Association. Tommy Loving, who also leads the Warren County Drug Task, says he fears marijuana growers will plant their crops next to hemp, making it difficult for law enforcement to distinguish between the two.

Some agriculture experts say planting the two crops together would destroy the potency of the marijuana over time, but Loving told WKU Public Radio that wouldn’t deter those looking to hide from law enforcement.

"If you plant marijuana with hemp surrounding it, for instance, in one growing season, you’re not going to diminish that much of the THC content in the marijuana. So your marijuana crop is still going to be a sellable commodity,” said Loving.

CONTINUE READING…

 

KSP: Hemp backers ‘naive’ after endorsing Senate bill

by Joe Arnold

WHAS11.com

Posted on January 28, 2013 at 4:32 PM

Updated today at 8:20 AM

FRANKFORT, Ky (WHAS11) — With momentum building for an effort to license hemp farming in Kentucky, law enforcement leaders lashed out on Monday, saying hemp’s supporters are looking at the issue "through rose-colored glasses."
The pushback came as Kentucky’s Industrial Hemp Commission met at the Agriculture Commissioner’s offices and voted to endorse Senate hemp legislation. 
All three representatives of law enforcement on the commission were absent, including Operation UNITE’s Dan Smoot who joined in the news release from the Kentucky Narcotic Officers’ Association in opposition to Senate Bill 50 and House Bill 33.

CONTINUE READING…

Ky. hemp supporters gain big endorsement

Published: January 20, 2013

By BRUCE SCHREINER — Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Industrial hemp’s repositioning toward mainstream status gained ground with a timely endorsement from the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. But the plant’s proponents have more work to do in cultivating support to legalize a crop that once was a Bluegrass state staple.

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The chamber said recently that provided there’s adequate regulatory oversight, it supports legislation to position Kentucky as a leader in the production and commercialization of industrial hemp. The position was hailed by hemp backers, noting the chamber’s political clout.

"When Kentucky’s leading voice for small businesses and economic development endorses a piece of legislation, lawmakers sit up and listen," said state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, a former state lawmaker.

Comer is leading the comeback campaign for the versatile crop outlawed for decades due to its association with its cousin, marijuana. Hemp has a negligible content of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives marijuana users a high.

Comer, a farmer himself, touts hemp’s potential while crisscrossing the state, saying Kentucky can become a hub of hemp production and manufacturing. The crop can be turned into paper, clothing, food, biofuel, lotions and other products.

"We could be the Silicon Valley of industrial hemp manufacturing right here in Kentucky," Comer said recently.

Bills aimed at legalizing the crop have been introduced in the Kentucky House and Senate, and lawmakers are expected to debate the issue when they return to the State Capitol in Frankfort next month to resume the 2013 session.

But hemp backers acknowledge challenges remain, namely resistance from Kentucky State Police. And that opposition could have a spillover effect with lawmakers hesitant to oppose the state’s top law enforcement agency.

State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer last month restated the agency’s opposition, saying law enforcement may have difficulty distinguishing between hemp and marijuana.

Comer met with Brewer following a meeting of the Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission late last year, but the commissioner said they’ve had no follow-up discussions. Comer said he’d like to have state police support but sees the agency’s resistance as a "non-factor."

"I was a state representative for 11 years and very few bills ever passed without somebody being opposed to them," he said.

Republican Sen. Paul Hornback of Shelbyville, lead sponsor of one of the hemp bills, said state police opposition will be an obstacle. But he said the state chamber’s support for legalizing the crop helps reshape the crop’s image.

"Everybody has to feel comfortable with the bill," said Hornback, a tobacco farmer who once was lukewarm to hemp. "With the stature that the state chamber has, I think it does legitimize it. It brings credibility to the issue."

Supporters say there’s a ready-made market for hemp, pointing to industry estimates that U.S. retail sales of hemp products exceed $400 million. Hemp is grown legally in Canada and many other countries, and imports into the U.S. include finished hemp products.

At least a couple of Kentucky companies – a tobacco processor and a seed supplier – have expressed interest in branching out into hemp. Hemp supporters say that could lead to jobs, especially in rural areas.

But the resistance of state police could be a sticking point for some lawmakers, including the top House leader.

"It will be difficult to pass any legislation that doesn’t have the support of the Kentucky State Police and Kentucky’s law enforcement community," said House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg. "As long as they have reservations, I have reservations."

Another potentially key player in the debate, Rep. Tom McKee, D-Cynthiana, said the biggest impediments to hemp’s comeback are the federal ban on hemp and the concerns of state police.

But McKee, chairman of the House Agriculture and Small Business Committee, hasn’t yet staked out a position on the issue.

"We don’t want to close a door on any viable agricultural crop that is profitable and would be well-accepted," he said.

Under Hornback’s bill, hemp growers would need licenses, and applicants would have to pass criminal background checks.

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said he would seek a waiver from the federal ban on hemp for Kentucky if state lawmakers vote to legalize the crop. Paul also has pushed for federal legislation to remove restrictions on hemp cultivation. The Kentucky Republican said hemp supporters need to persuade law enforcement skeptics that the crop "won’t make the drug problem worse."

"We live in a modern world where we have GPS," he said in a recent speech in Frankfort. "Couldn’t a farmer or anybody who wants to grow it just get a simple one-page permit and say these are my GPS coordinates where it’s being grown and it could be checked?"

As for Comer, the agriculture commissioner has said he won’t defy the federal government on the issue.

The crop hasn’t been grown in the U.S. since the 1950s. Kentucky once was a leading producer of industrial hemp. During World War II, the U.S. government encouraged farmers to grow hemp for the war effort because other industrial fibers, often imported from overseas, were in short supply.

Because it can thrive in small, sloping plots, Comer said hemp could be a viable crop on marginal land in central and eastern Kentucky.

"A decade from now, someone will look back and think, ‘You mean there were people opposed to growing industrial hemp?’" he said.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2013/01/20/2483327/hemp-supporters-gain-big-endorsement.html#storylink=cpy

TO ALL THOSE WHO BELIEVE THAT TOTAL REPEAL OF PROHIBITION IS IMPOSSIBLE… I SAY

By:  Rev. Mary Thomas-Spears

 

 

 

APPARENTLY YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND LAW OR YOUR CONSTITUTION

NOR DO YOU UNDERSTAND THAT, NOTHING IS AS IT APPEARS TO BE

MOST THOUGHT IT WAS IMPOSSIBLE… FOR ME TO BEAT 6 FELONIES FOR TRAFFICKING IN A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, WHEN I NEVER DENIED MY GUILT. THOUGH I WAS CONVICTED OF ONE FELONY IN THAT CASE… I MADE U.S. LEGAL HISTORY FOR BEING THE ONLY DRUG TRAFFICKING FELON TO NEVER SERVE ANY SIGNIFICANT TIME ON A SENTENCE, WHILE I FLUNKED EVERY DRUG TEST GIVEN BY THE COURTS FOR THC.

MOST THOUGHT IT IMPOSSIBLE…  FOR ME OR ANY ONE TO SET OUT TO DECRIM THIS PLANT HERE IN KENTUCKY 20 YRS AGO…

YET, TODAY, IT IS A TICKET-ABLE OFFENSE UP TO 8 OZ’S OR 4 PLANTS AND THEY NOW OFFER A TAX STAMP FOR ANY QUANTITY OVER THAT AMOUNT {NOT THAT I SEE THE TAX AS A GOOD THING, YET, THEY MUST FIRST RECOGNIZE SOMETHING AS LEGAL TO REGULATE IN ORDER TO TAX IT.}

STILL UNCONSTITUTIONAL WHEN IT COMES TO MY PERSONAL RIGHT TO UTILIZE OR GROW

MOST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE… FOR ME OR US {EVEN THOSE FEW OF US WHO TOOK ON THE TASK, KNEW THE ODDS WEREN’T IN OUR FAVOR} TO GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT THE "LEGALIZE = LEGAL LIES" AND HOW THEY USE IT TO GAIN CONTROL OVER THE PLANT TO GMO… THAT WE’D BEEN BASICALLY LEAD BY THE NOSE… AND FEEDING THE MONSTER… HELL THEY NEVER THOUGHT WE’D GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT GMO HEMP/CANNABIS/MARIJUANA [.]

TODAY THERE ARE ENTIRE ORGANIZATIONS SET UP IN OTHER AREAS IN THE COUNTRY TO WATCH FOR GMO CANNABIS/MARIJUANA/HEMP AND TO CERTIFY PRODUCTS GMO FREE…

HELL I THOUGHT I WAS FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE FOR A MINUTE WHEN… I TRIED TO SHOW THIS SAME INFORMATION TO  GATEWOOD GALBRAITH FREEDOM FIGHTER AND DEFENDER OF THE CONSTITUTION AND THE PEOPLE HERE IN KENTUCKY… AND HE SCREAMED AT ME, WHEN I CAME TO HIM WITH THIS ISSUE, RESEARCH AND INFO. NEARLY 7 YRS AGO, AT WHICH POINT HE TOLD ME, "LEAVE IT ALONE MARY!!! LEAVE THAT ISSUE IN CALI!!!…"

SO I DID, AND SO I SUGGESTED TO RON K., WE SHOULD TAKE THE INFO TO JACK HERER WHO WE BOTH KNEW… SO THEN RON KICZENSKI AND MYSELF, TOOK THE INFO WE HAD GATHERED TO JACK HERER {RON LIVING NEAR HIM, WHILE I ONLY SPOKE WITH HIM BY PHONE AND E-MAILS..} AND ASKED HIM TO EXAMINE IT AND NOT TO BELIEVE US, BUT TO DO HIS OWN RESEARCH AND IF HE AGREED WITH US TO REWRITE CALI’S LAWS, WITH A NEW INITIATIVE, THAT WOULD END PROHIBITION THROUGH REPEAL AND PROTECT THE PLANT FROM GMO MUTATION AND SO HE DID. AFTER WHICH, HE WROTE THE JACK HERER INITIATIVE NOW DUBBED CCHHI2012, WHICH WE {RON AND MYSELF} HELPED HIM TO WORD AND WHICH IS CURRENTLY GATHERING SIGNATURES FOR THE BALLOT IN CALI TODAY.

AN INITIATIVE WHICH WE HAD PLANNED ALL ALONG TO PIT, AGAINST ANY OTHER LEGALIZATION LEGISLATION AND THEN CAME PROP. 19, SO WE DID WHAT WE HAD PLANNED… AND AGAIN, WHAT MOST EVERYONE SAID WAS IMPOSSIBLE… AND WE STOPPED PROP. 19 {WHICH WOULD HAVE LEGALIZED CANNABIS FOR EVERYONE AND HAD MUCH SUPPORT THERE IN CALI… } FROM PASSING JUST IN THE NICK OF TIME IN MY OPINION TO SAVE THE PLANT AND THE PEOPLE FROM THE CORPORATIONS AND GOVERNMENTS COMPLETE OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL.

AT WHICH POINT MY HERO, MY ATTORNEY, MY MENTOR, MY FRIEND,… GATEWOOD GALBRAITH, WHO COULD NOT HEAR ME WHEN I SAID IT TO HIM… AND SCREAMED AT ME TO LET IT GO THEN WROTE ON ANOTHER WEBSITE ON THIS ISSUE,

Gatewood said…

I am an out-of-state observer who may have a hand in writing the future marijuana laws of Kentucky.

I immediately felt great hope when I first heard about the "legalization" forthcoming in Nov. in

California but when I heard that my good friends Jack Herer and Dennis Peron opposed its

passage, I was greatly intrigued. Now I thoroughly understand their positions. Thanks for your

exhaustive effort. I can sympathize with having such a burden lifted. Gatewood Galbraith

July 15, 2010 7:06 AM

IN RESPONSE TO, "WHY PRO-POT ACTIVISTS OPPOSE PROP. 19: 19 REASONS TO VOTE KNOW"

http://votetaxcannabis2010.blogspot.com/2010/07/why-pro-pot-activists-oppose-2010-tax.html

HELL THE DOCTORS HAVE BEEN TELLING ME I AM FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE FOR MANY YRS… YET, I AM STILL HERE AND WALKING, WHEN THEY SAID, I WOULDN’T BE.

SO………

I KNOW THAT NOTHING IS, AS IT APPEARS TO BE…

AND THAT DESPITE HOW THINGS MIGHT APPEAR… NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE WHEN IT COMES TO THIS ISSUE OR MOVEMENT.

AND IT ONLY TAKES A FEW OF COMMITTED PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE TRUTH.

"PROTECT THE PLANT THAT PROTECTS THE PEOPLE"

CHANGE YOUR LEGISLATION TO READ "NO GMO’S" AND RETURN IT UNTAXED TO OUR GARDENS TODAY!

SO I WILL CONTINUE IN MY EXHAUSTIVE EFFORTS, FOR ALL THOSE WHO WRITE TO ASK ME? WHY I HAVEN’T STUCK A GUN IN MY MOUTH YET OR WHY I HAVEN’T REALIZED THAT I AM FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE THAT GOES AGAINST THE TIDE.

Dad raised hemp for rope production, not for smoking, after World War II 5:43 PM, Sep 8, 2012

John Newport,  Springfield

 

http://stevemarkwell.com/images/rescuetripmar2009/061.jpg

 

Festival-goers celebrate hemp’s diversity” (News-Leader, Sep. 3) brought back memories. In 1946, I was living on a farm in south central Kentucky, and one spring day a couple of “feds” came by and asked my dad and the farmer on an adjoining farm if they would raise a few acres of hemp and harvest the seed.

The seeds were being grown for export to the Phillipines, where hemp had been a main crop before the war, and was used to make rope. As a result of the war, hemp seeds in the Phillipines were either in short supply, or nonexistent. My dad and the other farmer agreed to raise some hemp, and were well paid to do so.

The feds specified how the seeds were to be planted — in crossed rows, which made it possible to cultivate for weed control by plowing from east to west and from north to south.

They also specified how the seeds were to be “thrashed” by hand, and said that all stalks and leaves were to be burned immediately after the seeds had been gathered — which we thought was somewhat unusual.

Gathering and piling up the stalks, which were about 8 feet high, and burning them turned out to be the hardest part of the job.

My dad smoked his home-grown tobacco, and the thought of smoking some hemp leaves probably never occurred to him. However, the farmer on the adjoining farm didn’t smoke tobacco, and he smoked some hemp leaves — one time, he said.

He said the strange feelings he had after smoking hemp were such that he was afraid of something different, and worse, happening if he smoked it again.

Each summer for the next three years, the feds came by and looked for any hemp plants that might have grown from seeds lost in the “thrashing” process, and from being carried by birds far from the areas where the hemp had been grown.

Today, when I hear about people growing marijuana, I think, “Been there, done that.”

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