ATTENTION KENTUCKY: ANOTHER PIPELINE PLAN FOR NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS

Saturday, 08 November 2014 10:00

 

 

 

 

The alarm is ringing again for Kentuckians who already stopped one potentially hazardous pipeline project. Public backlash plugged plans for the Bluegrass Pipeline, which included building 180 miles of new pipeline to help transport natural gas liquids from the Northeast to the Gulf Coast. Now, less than a year later, another pipeline for the fracking industry is in the works – this time to repurpose the Tennessee Gas Pipeline to move natural gas liquids. Environmental advocate Chris Schimmoeller calls it "a far different beast" from natural gas.

The Tennessee Gas Pipeline system currently travels just over one-thousand miles from Pennsylvania to Louisiana. Installed primarily in the 1950s, it runs 256 miles through 18 Kentucky counties. Campbellsville, Danville, Glasgow, Morehead and Richmond are among the towns near its path.

Energy conglomerates Kinder Morgan and MarkWest want to make the pipeline conversion to natural gas liquids by 2017. Marion County Judge Executive John Mattingly opposes the idea.

With this second pipeline controversy brewing in Kentucky, citizens who united to stop the Bluegrass Pipeline are hosting a summit tomorrow (November 8) in Lexington about fracking. Schimmoeller, one of the summit’s organizers, says there will also be a focus on how to move away from fossil fuels.

CONTINUE READING…

What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?

 

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FrackingWastePit_BGS_WEB.jpg

 

The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

Ban Fracking in Your Area

No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

Learn More

 

UK government found ‘cheerleading’ for fracking industry

British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) is taken on a guided tour of the IGas shale drilling plant oil depot by Operations Manager Andrew Austin (L) and Chief Operating Officer John Chief Blaymyers (c) near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire on January 13, 2014. (Reuters / Lindsey Parnaby)

British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) is taken on a guided tour of the IGas shale

drilling plant oil depot by Operations Manager Andrew Austin (L) and Chief Operating

Officer John Chief Blaymyers (c) near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire on January 13, 2014.

(Reuters / Lindsey Parnaby)

British government officials have been collaborating in private with shale gas companies to manage the public’s hostility to fracking, it was revealed in emails released under freedom of information act.

The UK government has been found sharing pre-prepared statements with shale gas bosses as well as meeting for elaborate dinners, as well as tet-a-tet for “further discussion over post dinner drinks”. The fracking industry also shared lists with the government of ‘stakeholders’ to be targeted.

The emails were sent throughout 2013. In one email discussing contentious policy plans the Department of Energy and Climate Change (Decc) apologizes to the UK Onshore Operatives Group (UKOOG): “Sorry to raise your blood pressure on this subject again, no expletives please!”

Another email from Centrica to Decc officials warned that officials in Lancashire County Council (a country which has seen earth tremors from exploratory fracking) were not convinced there was enough government regulation for shale gas.

“The most common theme [of a county council meeting] was that separate onshore regulation is needed of shale, they clearly don’t feel totally comfortable with the current situation/or understand how it will work,” the email read.

But Decc emailed UKOOG before a review by Public Health England of the health and environmental impact of fracking that the regulation was already sufficient.

“We are confident that there is robust appropriate regulation in the UK to ensure safe operations that minimize impacts to human health.”

In yet another email Ken Cronin, UKOOG’s chief executive, tells Duarte Figueira, head of unconventional gas and oil at Decc: “Thanks for a productive meeting (it’s like being set homework).”

A demonstrator holds a placard at the protest camp, near the entrance to a site run by Cuadrilla Resources, near Balcombe in southern England August 16, 2013. (Reuters / Stefan Wermuth)

A demonstrator holds a placard at the protest camp, near the entrance to a site run by Cuadrilla Resources, near Balcombe in southern England August 16, 2013. (Reuters / Stefan Wermuth)

Lawrence Carter, an energy campaigner at Greenpeace, who made the Freedom of Information request from Decc, said that the government has been acting as an arm of the industry.

“The government is supposed to represent the interests of the public when they deal with these companies, but the evidence is piling up that they’re all in it together.”

British Gas, which owns Centrica – a major player in the shale gas industry – has an executive working within Decc on secondment.

Officials have defended the revelations saying that such discussions were “right and proper”, reports The Guardian.

David Cameron, one of the government’s biggest supporters of fracking, has rejected EU proposals for binding rules for shale gas exploration. Earlier this week he also announced financial incentives for councils and local communities, slammed as bribes by opponents. The PM said the UK was going “all out for shale”.

Caroline Lucas, a Green Party MP, said the revelations were an example of the “creepily cozy” relationship between government and big energy companies.

"Apparently it’s not enough to give fracking companies generous tax breaks, the government also has to help them with their PR. Instead of cheerleading for fracking, the government should be working with community and renewable energy to move us towards a low carbon future,” she said.

Extraction by fracking involves pumping millions of gallons of water and chemicals into the ground, which creates excess hydro waste, which over time local residents worry will result in contamination of the water table.

Environmental protests have stalled exploration efforts across the UK.

The most recent protests were targeted against IGas, when demonstrators blocked access to a shale gas drilling site outside Manchester with a 1.5 ton wind turbine blade tied up with Christmas bow. A local activist group says the act is “symbolic” and the Britain should be pursuing more environmentally-friendly energy sources

CONTINUE READING…

Burning water well hard to fathom

Burning_Well.jpg

Denise Howard’s water well has been burning since May after a series of underground explosions, which blew off the well house. (Photo by John Flavell/The Independent, Ashland, Ky.)

Column —

By Ronnie Ellis
CNHI News Service

GLASGOW, Ky. — Some things are just hard to fathom. Hard to explain. Hard to ignore. A flaming drinking water well is one of them.

But Calvin and Denise Howard’s water well has been burning since May. I know because I stood next to it, watching the flame shoot a couple of feet into the air while talking to Denise Howard.

State inspectors have determined the well is “mine impacted,” contaminated with methane. CONTINUE TO STORY HERE….

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Memo by ShereeKrider

The above story is a very powerful reminder of just what harm can be done by mining of all kinds.  Methane is a very powerful gas – it could be your property next.  FRACKING  is the new and upcoming industrial mining choice.  The dangers of these types of environmental destruction for “profit” and the fact that “we the people” continue to “demand” more energy for all of our power needs will be the death of our world as we know it.  In fact it has already happened in so many places I urge you to search youtube, google, and other search databases for more indepth information I cannot begin to put it all here.  The bottom line is not only are we blowing ourselves up, we will have absolutely NO CLEAN WATER.  Humans cannot live without clean water.  Here is a video on Fracking:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5QqidiEEHw]