Concerning Johnny Boone…

Image may contain: 1 person

December 19, 2017, John Robert Boone, “Johnny Boone”, plead guilty to possession of more than 1000 marijuana plants, and to trafficking in Washington County Kentucky.  He was known as the “Godfather of Grass” and the leader of the “Cornbread Mafia” in Marion County Kentucky.

 U.S. District Judge Charles R. Simpson III in Louisville sentenced John Robert “Johnny” Boone, 74, formerly of Marion County, Kentucky, to 57 months.

He had previously fled to Canada for a number of years after having a grow operation spotted by the KSP near Springfield Kentucky in 2008 where he remained a fugitive until his arrest in 2016 when he was deported from Canada back to Kentucky.

On April 11th I received the first email from Johnny Boone’s niece regarding the conditions that her Uncle was living in while being incarcerated at the Elkton Federal Prison, located in Lisbon, Ohio.

He was due to be transferred to a “Half-Way” house on April 15th, but COVID-19 came into the picture and his release was postponed.  He is 76 years old and in in a setting that could cause him to lose his life to this horrid virus. 

His family is pleading for his release, and have done everything they can to attain it.  They are asking for our help! He could very well lose his life in this prison because of this Virus, and nobody seems to be acting fast enough to take care of the emergent situation, in regards to prisoner’s.  He is not the only one!  There are many more all over the Country and each State’s Citizen’s should inform their Governor’s that this is not acceptable!

If you remove the non-violent offenders from the system there will be much more room for the ones who do need to be contained, and there will be better medical care afforded to them – hopefully.

We’re not criminals, we’re not,” he said. “We’re not the kind of people who go out and harm people.”

On April 8, the National Guard arrived at Elkton Federal Prison in Columbiana County to assist the medical staff when a large number of prisoners became ill with the virus.[67] On April 18, the National Guard and Highway Patrol arrived at the state prison in Marion county to assist with “mission critical functions” after infections of correctional workers and prisoners.[68] By April 19, over 1800 prisoners at Marion Correctional Institution, approximately 3/4ths of the population, plus 100 staff had tested positive.[69] Overall, the prison system had almost 2500 cases by April 19, representing almost a fifth of Ohio’s cases.[69]

How Johnny Boone ended up in an Ohio Correctional Facility, instead of a Kentucky Facility is not known.  But regardless of that fact, he should have been transferred back to Kentucky, at the very least, when this outbreak began.  Now it seems that he is stuck in there with no recourse as the Virus continues to reek havoc on the prison industrial complex overall.

Why has Governor Beshear let this happen?  Although I understand the way that we were hit with this “attack” of the Virus it would have to be hard to manage it, but these people who are incarcerated are supposed to be properly cared for by the “System”. 

Even the most chronic or hardened inmates have basic rights that are protected by the U.S. Constitution. If you are facing incarceration, or if you have a family member or friend who is in prison or jail, you should know about inmates’ rights.

Considering Johnny Boone’s age and medical status, he should have been released early on.  There is absolutely no reason to keep this man incarcerated. 

Since Barr’s memorandum on April 3 directing Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Carvajal to consider measures to move minimum security inmates out of prison, few inmates have actually been released with the exception of those who were already planned for release.

With the following information in mind, I am urging everyone to send a memo to Gov. Beshear to request that he step in and make a decision to have Johnny Boone removed from Elkton Correctional Institute immediately and brought back home to Kentucky!

 On April 13, 2020, inmates at Elkton Federal Correctional Institution, brought an emergency court action seeking release from Elkton due to the spread of COVID-19 within the prison (Reference United States District Court Northern District of Ohio, Craig Wilson, et v Mark Williams, et al, Case: 4:20-cv-00794). The action sought the release of some inmates from prison to Home Confinement or by Furlough, particularly those who were old or had an underlying conditions consistent with the guidelines provided by the Center for Decision Control. Noted in the lawsuit was the “dorm-style” design of most minimum and low prisons where inmates live in close proximity to one another.

Please do not let either Johnny Boone or any other Inmates suffer and die needlessly in such condition!

This is the Government’s responsibility to keep these people safe from harm as they serve their time.  There is no reason to keep a non-violent offender in a prison system in these conditions!

Please take this into consideration and free Johnny Boone to his family!

Governor Andy Beshear

700 Capitol Avenue, Suite 100
Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

Main Line: (502) 564-2611
Fax: (502) 564-2517

SEND EMAIL ONLINE THRU THIS LINK!

Joe Keith Bickett- Author: Cornbread Mafia Origins to Outlaws

RELATED:

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.wordpress.com/?s=Johnny+Boone

https://governor.ky.gov/contact/contact-us

https://www.forbes.com/sites/walterpavlo/2020/04/23/federal-judge-in-ohio-says-fci-elkton-meets-cruel-and-unusual-punishment-standard/?fbclid=IwAR1n2U-S6F_F08Fa1jSVoq7xGm74aMZoILNp77s9tCAGVuRUg3LCcMvKZm8#1f906b2a20d4

https://civilrights.findlaw.com/other-constitutional-rights/rights-of-inmates.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_of_the_COVID-19_pandemic_on_prisons#Ohio

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12926917-the-cornbread-mafia

https://www.kentucky.com/news/local/crime/article159441349.html

https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/godfather-of-grass-sentenced-to-57-months-in-prison-1.3845091

https://www.lebanonenterprise.com/content/johnny-boone-pleads-guilty

https://cavecitykentucky.wordpress.com/2017/04/05/legendary-pot-grower-johnny-boone-leader-of-kentuckys-cornbread-mafia-back-in-u-s/

https://www.civilized.life/articles/the-godfather-of-grass-deported-from-canada-to-the-u-s/

http://www.corizonhealth.com/Corizon-News/connections/landmark-case-guarantees-prisoners-the-right-to-medical-care

Every 25 seconds in the United States, someone is arrested for the simple act of possessing drugs for their personal use…

Interview: Why the US Should Decriminalize Drug Use

 

Summary

 

Neal Scott may die in prison. A 49-year-old Black man from New Orleans, Neal had cycled in and out of prison for drug possession over a number of years. He said he was never offered treatment for his drug dependence; instead, the criminal justice system gave him time behind bars and felony convictions—most recently, five years for possessing a small amount of cocaine and a crack pipe. When Neal was arrested in May 2015, he was homeless and could not walk without pain, struggling with a rare autoimmune disease that required routine hospitalizations. Because he could not afford his $7,500 bond, Neal remained in jail for months, where he did not receive proper medication and his health declined drastically—one day he even passed out in the courtroom. Neal eventually pled guilty because he would face a minimum of 20 years in prison if he took his drug possession case to trial and lost. He told us that he cried the day he pled, because he knew he might not survive his sentence.[1]

***

Just short of her 30th birthday, Nicole Bishop spent three months in jail in Houston for heroin residue in an empty baggie and cocaine residue inside a plastic straw. Although the prosecutor could have charged misdemeanor paraphernalia, he sought felony drug possession charges instead. They would be her first felonies.

Nicole was separated from her three young children, including her breastfeeding newborn. When the baby visited Nicole in jail, she could not hear her mother’s voice or feel her touch because there was thick glass between them. Nicole finally accepted a deal from the prosecutor: she would do seven months in prison in exchange for a guilty plea for the 0.01 grams of heroin found in the baggie, and he would dismiss the straw charge. She would return to her children later that year, but as a “felon” and “drug offender.” As a result, Nicole said she would lose her student financial aid and have to give up pursuit of a degree in business administration. She would have trouble finding a job and would not be able to have her name on the lease for the home she shared with her husband. She would no longer qualify for the food stamps she had relied on to help feed her children. As she told us, she would end up punished for the rest of her life.

***

Every 25 seconds in the United States, someone is arrested for the simple act of possessing drugs for their personal use, just as Neal and Nicole were. Around the country, police make more arrests for drug possession than for any other crime. More than one of every nine arrests by state law enforcement is for drug possession, amounting to more than 1.25 million arrests each year. And despite officials’ claims that drug laws are meant to curb drug sales, four times as many people are arrested for possessing drugs as are arrested for selling them.

As a result of these arrests, on any given day at least 137,000 men and women are behind bars in the United States for drug possession, some 48,000 of them in state prisons and 89,000 in jails, most of the latter in pretrial detention. Each day, tens of thousands more are convicted, cycle through jails and prisons, and spend extended periods on probation and parole, often burdened with crippling debt from court-imposed fines and fees. Their criminal records lock them out of jobs, housing, education, welfare assistance, voting, and much more, and subject them to discrimination and stigma. The cost to them and to their families and communities, as well as to the taxpayer, is devastating. Those impacted are disproportionately communities of color and the poor.

This report lays bare the human costs of criminalizing personal drug use and possession in the US, focusing on four states: Texas, Louisiana, Florida, and New York. Drawing from over 365 interviews with people arrested and prosecuted for their drug use, attorneys, officials, activists, and family members, and extensive new analysis of national and state data, the report shows how criminalizing drug possession has caused dramatic and unnecessary harms in these states and around the country, both for individuals and for communities that are subject to discriminatory enforcement.

There are injustices and corresponding harms at every stage of the criminal process, harms that are all the more apparent when, as often happens, police, prosecutors, or judges respond to drug use as aggressively as the law allows. This report covers each stage of that process, beginning with searches, seizures, and the ways that drug possession arrests shape interactions with and perceptions of the police—including for the family members and friends of individuals who are arrested. We examine the aggressive tactics of many prosecutors, including charging people with felonies for tiny, sometimes even “trace” amounts of drugs, and detail how pretrial detention and long sentences combine to coerce the overwhelming majority of drug possession defendants to plead guilty, including, in some cases, individuals who later prove to be innocent.

The report also shows how probation and criminal justice debt often hang over people’s heads long after their conviction, sometimes making it impossible for them to move on or make ends meet. Finally, through many stories, we recount how harmful the long-term consequences of incarceration and a criminal record that follow a conviction for drug possession can be—separating parents from young children and excluding individuals and sometimes families from welfare assistance, public housing, voting, employment opportunities, and much more.

Families, friends, and neighbors understandably want government to take actions to prevent the potential harms of drug use and drug dependence. Yet the current model of criminalization does little to help people whose drug use has become problematic. Treatment for those who need and want it is often unavailable, and criminalization tends to drive people who use drugs underground, making it less likely that they will access care and more likely that they will engage in unsafe practices that make them vulnerable to disease and overdose.

While governments have a legitimate interest in preventing problematic drug use, the criminal law is not the solution. Criminalizing drug use simply has not worked as a matter of practice. Rates of drug use fluctuate, but they have not declined significantly since the “war on drugs” was declared more than four decades ago. The criminalization of drug use and possession is also inherently problematic because it represents a restriction on individual rights that is neither necessary nor proportionate to the goals it seeks to accomplish. It punishes an activity that does not directly harm others.

Instead, governments should expand public education programs that accurately describe the risks and potential harms of drug use, including the potential to cause drug dependence, and should increase access to voluntary, affordable, and evidence-based treatment for drug dependence and other medical and social services outside the court and prison system.

After decades of “tough on crime” policies, there is growing recognition in the US that governments need to undertake meaningful criminal justice reform and that the “war on drugs” has failed. This report shows that although taking on parts of the problem—such as police abuse, long sentences, and marijuana reclassif
ication—is critical, it is not enough: Criminalization is simply the wrong response to drug use and needs to be rethought altogether.

Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union call on all states and the federal government to decriminalize the use and possession for personal use of all drugs and to focus instead on prevention and harm reduction. Until decriminalization has been achieved, we urge officials to take strong measures to minimize and mitigate the harmful consequences of existing laws and policies. The costs of the status quo, as this report shows, are too great to bear.

 

CONTINUE READING

 

LINK TO PDF VERSION OF REPORT (205 PAGES)

We live in the only country in the world where a child can be sentenced to be in prison until they die

Juwan being interrogated

We live in the only country in the world where a child can be sentenced to be in prison until they die.

What’s worse is that it’s not even rare — more than 2,500 people who were sentenced as kids will spend the rest of their lives in prison.

Juwan is one of them. He was a skinny 16-year-old kid when he was arrested after he saw a companion kill a pizza deliveryman. The shooter was never convicted, but because Juwan was present and had a gun, he was sentenced to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Without the possibility of parole, Juwan will never have a second chance for rehabilitation.

Just one year before Juwan was sentenced, the Supreme Court decided that mandatory juvenile life without parole was unconstitutional cruel and unusual punishment.

The problem is — the decision left gaping loopholes and didn’t ban the sentence outright, meaning that Juwan and other children became victims of poor timing and inadequate policy implementation. While six states have moved to ban the practice, this barbaric punishment is still perfectly legal in 44 states.

But the Department of Justice has the power to close some of these loopholes and set the standard on the federal level. By providing policy guidelines for U.S. attorneys, the DOJ can ensure that judges are empowered to use discretion and give appropriate sentences based on unique circumstances.

Attorney General Eric Holder has already endorsed proposals that limit life without parole sentences for non-violent drug offenders. If he hears from thousands of us who support criminal justice reform, he can provide the tools needed to limit juvenile life without parole sentences.

It’s time that we give kids like Juwan a second chance at life.

PLEASE FOLLOW THIS LINK AND SIGN PETITION!

We live in the only country in the world where a child can be sentenced to be in prison until they die

Juwan being interrogated

We live in the only country in the world where a child can be sentenced to be in prison until they die.

What’s worse is that it’s not even rare — more than 2,500 people who were sentenced as kids will spend the rest of their lives in prison.

Juwan is one of them. He was a skinny 16-year-old kid when he was arrested after he saw a companion kill a pizza deliveryman. The shooter was never convicted, but because Juwan was present and had a gun, he was sentenced to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Without the possibility of parole, Juwan will never have a second chance for rehabilitation.

Just one year before Juwan was sentenced, the Supreme Court decided that mandatory juvenile life without parole was unconstitutional cruel and unusual punishment.

The problem is — the decision left gaping loopholes and didn’t ban the sentence outright, meaning that Juwan and other children became victims of poor timing and inadequate policy implementation. While six states have moved to ban the practice, this barbaric punishment is still perfectly legal in 44 states.

But the Department of Justice has the power to close some of these loopholes and set the standard on the federal level. By providing policy guidelines for U.S. attorneys, the DOJ can ensure that judges are empowered to use discretion and give appropriate sentences based on unique circumstances.

Attorney General Eric Holder has already endorsed proposals that limit life without parole sentences for non-violent drug offenders. If he hears from thousands of us who support criminal justice reform, he can provide the tools needed to limit juvenile life without parole sentences.

It’s time that we give kids like Juwan a second chance at life.

PLEASE FOLLOW THIS LINK AND SIGN PETITION!

BREAKING: Death Sentence for a $96 ticket (NJWEEDMAN)

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQwkMeHGUX8&w=448&h=252&hd=1]
NJ WEEDMAN reads a letter from a prisoner who turns in jail for a wrongful death.

Published on Feb 10, 2014

special thanks to http://njweedman.com/ for bringing us this story.
In this video Luke Rudkowski interviews Ed Forchion the NJ Weed Man after he was recently released from jail and was given a shocking letter from a fellow inmate.

The letter details gross misconduct and neglect on behave of correctional officers which some are saying resulted in the murder of a fellow inmate.

The inmate who released the story to the public was put into solitary confinement for writing this letter.

 
Show your support by writing the whistle blower inmate at
Sean C. Turzanski # 90248
Burlington County Jail
54 Grant St.
Mt. Holly NJ 08060

follow luke on https://twitter.com/Lukewearechange
https://facebook.com/LukeWeAreChange
http://instagram.com/lukewearechange
https://plus.google.com/1023224594778…
Support us by subscribing here http://bit.ly/P05Kqb
http;//www.facebook.com/wearechange.org
Check out our merchandise: http://wearechange.org/store/
Become a member of The Sponsor Lounge and get exclusive behind the scenes content while helping us grow! Join us today! http:///www.wearechange.org/donate

Imprisoned Gay Man Suing Kentucky Jail After Nose Bitten Off By Inmate

 

 

An incarcerated gay man in Kentucky’s Warren County Regional Jail endured days of harassment from fellow prisoners before one of them bit off part of his nose.

Now with the help of the Kentucky Equality Federation, Brandon Milam is suing the jail, its top official, the county and his assailant, Timothy Schwartz for assault, negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

“Other inmates made it well known that they did not approve that I was gay,” Milam said. According to his suit, Milam endured a week of “anti-homosexual slurs, insults and remarks” including death threats, from Schwartz and other inmates. On July 2, a friendly game of hearts turned bloody after Schwartz took the term “sore loser” to a whole other level.

“I remember hearing my nose getting ripped off my face and seeing him spit it on the floor. They all 4 started in yelling ‘Kill the Faggot’ and ‘Beat that lil’ Ho Fag.’ I was also called queer several times.”

Another inmate found the severed piece of nose, but an attempt to reattach it at Vanderbilt Hospital proved unsuccessful. Milam now faces four reconstructive surgeries, the first of which costs an estimated $26,000.

“I just want my medical bills paid for,” Milam told Bowling Green Daily News. “I want to get all of this behind me.”

Milam was in jail following a probation violation for a shoplifting charge but was put under house arrest after his attack. The suit alleges the jail and jailer Jackie Strode acted with deliberate indifference in placing Milam, whom they knew was gay, in a cell with 14 other men.

“While being homosexual in and of itself does not necessarily warrant special treatment while incarcerated, recklessly ignoring this fact and placing a vulnerable inmate with others who are likely to commit a violent act such as this meets the legal standard and opens the facility, on-duty guards, and jailer to civil action,” said KEF’s Vice President of Legal, Jillian Hall.

“Steps must be taken to protect LGBTI inmates from violence, especially when they are already being called derogatory names such as queer and faggot,” Kentucky Equality Federation President Jordan Palmer said in a statement. “This case reaches beyond what happened to Mr. Milam; since anyone can swear a warrant for your arrest this could happen to any LGBTI community member or any other minority group, regardless of substantial evidence or even guilt.”

Full story here: http://www.queerty.com/imprisoned-gay-man-suing-kentucky-jail-after-nose-bitten-off-by-inmate-20121017/#ixzz29ZTIwadG

By: Lester Brathwaite
On: Oct 17, 2012
Tagged: brandon milam, jail, Kentucky, kentucky equality federation, lgbt prisoners